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Instability Threatens Ecotourism in Madagascar
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Instability Threatens Ecotourism in Madagascar

In places like Andasibe National Park, tour guides are finding themselves out of work as the country's political instability has deterred ecotourists, many of whom had come in recent years to see animals such as the Indri lemur. (Karin Brulliard/The Washington Post, edited by Francine Uenuma/The Washington Post)

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Natural Resources Under Siege
Article | MAROJEJY NATIONAL PARK, Madagascar -- A political crisis in this African island nation has triggered a pillage of its mythical wildlife and forests, and conservation groups fear that the peril will worsen as donors suspend funding to punish coup leaders running the country.

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