In Kenya, ethnic distrust still runs deep
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In Kenya, ethnic distrust still runs deep

Thirty-six people died when the Kenya Assemblies of God Church was attacked and burned down by ethnic Kalenjin militias during Kenya's post election violence nearly two years ago. Alleged attackers and victims talk about what happened. (Miguel Juarez/For the Washington Post)

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