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The relationship between the pro-life movement and the Republican party
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The relationship between the pro-life movement and the Republican party

Kristan Hawkins, executive director of Students for Life of America, canvasses at the University of Maryland, Baltimore. Hawkins aims to reach out to incoming freshman who are new to political issues and debate. (Jerry Markon and Emily Kotecki/The Washington Post)

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