Scientists discuss regrowth of Eastern forests
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Scientists discuss regrowth of Eastern forests

Scientists at the Smithsonian Institution-owned National Zoo Conservation and Research Center near Front Royal, Va. explain a fence that was constructed in the 1990s to monitor how forests regrow with and without a deer population. A dense deer population exists in the majority of the forest, eating young trees and plants and inhibiting the forest from re-growing properly. (David Fahrenthold/The Washington Post)

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