'Weed Warriors' turn vines into vine art
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'Weed Warriors' turn vines into vine art

Bethesda couple Seth Goldstein and Paula Stone started building sculptures out of the invasive Oriental Bittersweet vine in 2008. The sculptures have been exhibited at Brookside Gardens and the Nature Conservancy headquarters. (Alexandra Garcia/The Washington Post)

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