Of peanuts and leaf blowers
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Of peanuts and leaf blowers

When Dan Steinhilber had a solo show at the Baltimore Museum of Art, in 2006, most of his work had a material, touchable punch: packing peanuts and leaf blowers were his main art supplies. Taking off from there, the sculptor also made this work of video art that appealed only to the eyes and ears -- and pocketbook (the BMA bought it). For that untitled piece, he showed his own apartment overrun by drifts of his foam pellets. Wielding a blower (and a video camera) Steinhilber tried, and failed, to chase the home invaders off. (Dan Steinhilber/The Washington Post)

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