Video excerpt: 'What Visions Burn'
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Video excerpt: 'What Visions Burn'

For a projected video called "What Visions Burn," New Yorker Ezra Johnson painted and repainted a series of canvases, compiling them into a 22-minute animation that depicts an art theft, car chase and fire. Rather than telling a straightforward story, the piece has some of the cryptic depths of a traditional painting. Thanks to video projection, it also has the scale of a painting. Through Jan. 2, Johnson's piece is on display at the Eighth International Biennial at SITE Santa Fe in New Mexico. (Ezra Johnson)

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