Family uses cued speech to communicate
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Family uses cued speech to communicate

In 2005, Rockville residents Steve Scher and Grace Consacro learned their twin daughters, Lola and Ella, were born with hearing losses. Rather than learning sign language, Lola and Ella learned English with cued speech, a communication technique that visually represents the sounds of speech. (Anthony Castellano/The Gazette)

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