Chantilly coach sounds off on coaching friendships
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Chantilly coach sounds off on coaching friendships

As he endured through an emotionally trying period of time, Chantilly basketball coach Jim Smith found that his coaching friendships were a source of strength. The Chantilly assistant coaches -- some of which have served under Smith for more than a decade -- make up one of the Virginia AAA Northern Region's largest coaching staffs. In this video, Smith talks about how his staff has become a unified group of friends without the usual coaching hierarchy. (B.J. Koubaroulis and Mike Schwartz for Synthesis/Koubaroulis LLC/The Washington Post)

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