Audio: India's ancient Vedic tradition passed down
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Audio: India's ancient Vedic tradition passed down

Shankaranarayanan Akkithiripadu teaches his 8-year old grandson, Shankar, to memorize and chant thousands of verses of Sanskrit rhythmic incantations from the ancient holy Hindu scripture, the Rig Veda, in the same manner that it has been taught for over three millennia. (Rama Lakshmi/The Washington Post)

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