Digging for whale fossils in Virginia
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Digging for whale fossils in Virginia

Alton Dooley has been digging for miocene-era whale fossils at the Martin Marietta Carmel Church quarry excavation site for about 20 years. One of the richest fossil beds on the east coast, especially for the miocene era, the dig yields an alternative spring break for Virginia college students, as well as hundreds of prehistoric whale and shark fossils. (AJ Chavar/The Washington Post)

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