EDUCATION High Tech and Education Review

  NEWS
  Politics
  Nation
  World
  Metro
  Style
  Business
  Technology
  Health
    EDUCATION
    Columns
    District
    Maryland
    Virginia
    Adult Education
    Higher Education
    Teachers
    Parenting
    Preschool
    K to 12
    School Guide
    KidsPost
    Special Reports
    Live Discussions
    Photo Galleries
    Education Index
  Real Estate
  Obituaries
  Corrections
  Archives

washingtonpost.com > Education
From The Washington Post Magazine

Sophie Howard, a third-grader at Lowell School, works on her Web page in the computer lab.
 Education Review
(Keith W. Jenkins)
Previous Issues
Old-Fashioned Classroom Nov. 2002
 July 2002
 April 2002
 November 2001
 September 2001
 July 2001
 April 2001
 November 2000
 July 2000
 April 2000
 November 1999
 July 1999
 April 1999
Elementary Ed
Learning to Be Wired 
For at least a decade now, it has been impossible to discuss the subject of education -- even at the elementary school level -- without reference to the potentially transforming power of computers.

High School
Not Your Father's Shop Class
Information technology has found its place alongside updated shop and construction classes in area high schools. Vo-tech is going high tech, and students striving for industry-sponsored certifications hope they will lead to internships, colleges and big salaries after graduation.

Higher Ed
Taking Classes To the Masses
Fathom, a for-profit company started by Columbia University to offer courses over the Internet, has a different tone from the rest of the university, only partly because Fathom's offices are half a city away.

Class Struggle
In the Beginning...
Two decades ago, we thought, technology would bring a new era in education. Learning would be interactive and participatory, tailored to individual needs and skills.

Homework
The Search for Intelligent Life Online
While some of the business models of the last few years have failed, there's no question that the World Wide Web is still one of the greatest resources ever created for students who need help on a term paper or a science project.



© 2002-2005 The Washington Post Company