EDUCATION June 2004 Education Review

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washingtonpost.com > Education

(Cover Photograph by Carol Guzy)
Live Discussion
 Writer Tyler Currie answers questions about his article "The Sound of Success," Monday at 1 p.m.
Education Review
 The Graduation Gap
 The Sound of Success
 From Laborer to Labor Leader
 Farewell to Hippie High
 A Matter of Degrees
 Full Report
The Sound of Success 
Despite their talented singers, Eastern High School choir faces an uncertain future.

A Matter of Degrees
My daughter's graduation from Reed College took place on the spacious lawn in front of the campus's Gothic dormitories.

Farewell to Hippie High
On the first day of his final year at H-B Woodlawn, Ray Anderson steps to a microphone on the stage of the Arlington County school's cozy auditorium. Nearly the whole school -- about 600 sixth- through 12th-graders and several dozen faculty members -- fills the wooden seats and stands against the aqua blue walls. The crowd greets the principal with a huge ovation. "Yeah, Ray, whoo-hoo!" screams a girl in a green T-shirt.

From Laborer to Labor Leader
Rob Raesch hadn't seen the inside of a college classroom for 25 years. The 54-year-old electrician felt "very, very intimidated" as he prepared to spend a week at the National Labor College in suburban Maryland. He signed up for two courses: reading and writing critically, and employment rights. It was the latter that both excited him and scared him to death, he said.

Class Struggle
The Graduation Gap
About two-thirds of this year's 3 million high school seniors will be starting college soon, an exciting time of unpacking, and buying textbooks, and forgetting that parents and curfews ever existed.



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