HEALTH Allergies

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Advantages Cleo, above, has over a real cat are that the robo-cat does not have to be fed or cleaned up after, like the frisky cloned kittens Tabouli and Baba Ganoush, top right, with Genetic Savings & Clone chief executive Lou Hawthorne last year. GS& C chief scientific officer Philip Damiani, right, is working to meet a deadline for cloning a dog. "I feel the pressure every day when I come to work," Damiani says. (Susan Biddle -- The Washington Post)
Web Resources
Web Links American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology
 National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
 Food Allergy Network
Purr. Whirr. 
Mecho-pets such as the catbot is easier for many people -- the elderly, the allergy-stricken, the autistic and disabled children and adults -- to relate to than a real cat.

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