HEALTH 5 Facts About Dietary Supplements

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washingtonpost.com > Health > Nutrition > Dietary Supplements

Dietary Supplements
What Do You Take Supplements For?

Burn Fat/Lose Weight
Meet Daily Vitamin Requirements
Build Strength/Body Mass
General Health Concerns
I Don't Take Supplements

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Testosterone Derided as A Health Supplement
There is no evidence that the hormone does anything to boost strength, mood or virility despite the claims being made for it, an expert panel of doctors has concluded.

Bush Orders Safety Review Of Ephedra
Two years after federal health officials sought warning labels on ephedra, the Bush administration instead is ordering a start-from-scratch safety review of the herb that has been linked to dozens of deaths.

Potent Drugs in Herbal Products, FDA Warns
Federal health officials warned consumers to immediately stop using two herbal treatments after investigators found they contain powerful prescription drugs.

How the Approval Programs Work
Makers of dietary supplements can now seek certification for their products under four separate programs. None of these programs verifies that a product is safe or effective and all require the makers to pay a fee.

The Beating Goes On
When added to a therapy consisting of a statin drug and niacin, antioxidant supplements suppress increases in HDL, the so-called good cholesterol, but have no effect on LDL, the bad cholesterol.

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