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washingtonpost.com > World > Special Reports > Pinochet and the Law

General Augusto Pinochet, shown in 1997. (AP)
Commentary
Chile Augusto Pinochet Novelist Ariel Dorfman writes about his obsession with seeing Pinochet brought to justice in The General's Handiwork
Overview
 Background Confronting the Ghosts of the Past
On the Web
 The Pinochet Precedent from Human Rights Watch
 Derechos Chile: Victims of Pinochet's Dictatorship
 Concentration Camps in Chile
Judge Backs Riggs's $16 Million Plea Deal
A federal judge Tuesday approved requiring Riggs Bank to pay a $16 million criminal fine for its failure to abide by federal anti-money-laundering laws and lambasted the bank as "a greedy corporate henchman of dictators and their corrupt regimes."

WORLD IN BRIEF
U.N. Peacekeepers to Go To Sudan but Not Darfur
UNITED NATIONS -- The U.N. Securi1y Council voted unanimously Thursday to authorize 10,700 peacekeepers for southern Sudan but remained deadlocked on any action for Darfur, in the west.

6 U.S. Banks Held Pinochet's Accounts
Former Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet had more than 125 accounts at a half-dozen U.S. banks, including Citibank, during the 1990s, according to a Senate report.

Full Coverage
Riggs, PNC Settle Lawsuit Brought by Shareholders (Post, March 4, 2005)

Drafts Show Allbritton's Pursuit of Pinochet (Post, March 3, 2005)

Allbrittons, Riggs to Pay Victims Of Pinochet: Settlement Ends Case in Spain (Post, Feb. 26, 2005)

Pinochet's Legacy Dims Under Cloud of Corruption, Abuse Probes (Post, Feb. 24, 2005)

Chilean Bank, U.S. Regulators Make Deal (Post, Feb. 3, 2005)

Riggs Bank Agrees to Guilty Plea And Fine: Civil, Criminal Penalties Would Total $41 Million (Post, Jan. 28, 2005)

U.S. Regulators Investigate Chilean Bank (Post, Jan. 22, 2005)

Chilean Court Upholds Indictment of Pinochet (Post, Jan. 5, 2005)

Legal Momentum Gathers in Chile Against Pinochet: Supreme Court Appears Ready to Decide Whether to Allow Trial on Murder and Kidnapping Charges (Post, Dec. 25, 2004)

Job Provision Born of Riggs Scandal (Post, Dec. 9, 2004)

Riggs Replaces Its Chief Legal Officer (Post, Dec. 4, 2004)

Pinochet Loses Immunity in '74 Slaying (Post, Dec. 3, 2004)

Riggs Uncovers Deep Ties to Pinochet: Internal Inquiry Finds Indications of Money Laundering (Post, Nov. 20, 2004)

WORLD IN BRIEF (Post, Nov. 11, 2004)

Legal Woes Cut Into Bottom Line at Riggs: Embassy Banking Proves Costly (Post, Nov. 10, 2004)

Pinochet Faces Tax Charges in Chile (Post, Oct. 2, 2004)

Probe Links Pinochet, Allbritton (Post, Sept. 14, 2004)

Riggs Bank Suspends 2nd Senior Executive (Post, Sept. 11, 2004)

Riggs Evidence Suggests Crimes By Employees: Inquiry Implicates Former Pinochet Account Managers (Post, Sept. 3, 2004)

WORLD IN BRIEF (Post, Sept. 1, 2004)

DID YOU HEAR? . . . (Post, Aug. 30, 2004)

Pinochet Loses Immunity in Chile: Ruling May Lead to Human Rights Trials (Post, Aug. 27, 2004)

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