The Best of Brando
The late, great Marlon Brando.
(AP Photo)
Marlon Brando, who died July 2 at the age of 80, left behind a career filled with memorable performances. But a few of his roles rise above the rest to stand among the most iconic, very best of Brando.
Related Links
Actor Marlon Brando Dies
Brando Filmography

"A Streetcar Named Desire"
1951
Brando became the rage-filled Stanley Kowalski in this adaptation of the Tennessee Williams drama, which includes perhaps the most famous delivery of the line "Stella!" ever captured on stage or screen.
Read The Post's Review


"On the Waterfront"
1954
Brando won his first Best Actor Oscar for his work in this Elia Kazan film. The movie, which also won the Oscar for Best Picture, may be most famous for the taxi cab scene where Brando tells Rod Steiger, "I coulda been a contender."
Read The Post's Review


"The Godfather"
1972
In the role that launched a thousand impersonations, Brando played mafia boss Don Vito Corleone. Despite his relatively brief amount of screen time, the film led to his second Academy Award as Best Actor.
Read The Post's Review
Read Review of "Godfather" Reissue


"Apocalypse Now"
1979
Starring opposite Martin Sheen in this Vietnam horror story, Brando played the insane Col. Walter Kurtz. Some may see vague parallels between the character's isolation from society and the reclusive figure the actor eventually became.
Read the Review of "Apocalypse Now Redux"


"The Freshman"
1990
This comedy, co-starring Matthew Broderick, is notable mainly because it allowed Brando to gleefully satirize his work in "The Godfather" films. It was one of only a handful of screen appearances from the latter part of his life.
Read a Post Review


"The Score"
2001
In his final film appearance, Brando starred opposite Robert De Niro and Edward Norton, two actors clearly influenced by the icon. In that way, albeit unintentionally, "The Score" brought Brando's career full-circle.
Read The Post's Style Review
Read The Post's Weekend Review

-- Jen Chaney, washingtonpost.com



© 2004 The Washington Post Company