Tuesday, Aug. 20, 2002
Greetings. I'm happy to bring you the first edition of our e-mail newsletter, which includes one news update, a great new recipe and a reader tip about keeping active. At the bottom, you'll find information about today's online chat on washingtonpost.com.

Food for Thought...

Want an easy way to cut your risk of unwanted pounds, heart disease and Type 2 diabetes? Make one simple switch: Eat whole grain bread, pasta, crackers and other carbohydrates in place of products made with refined white flour. In a study of nearly 3,000 people, researchers found that those who ate whole grain carbs weighed less, had better waist-to-hip ratios, lower total cholesterol, lower levels of the most damaging form of cholesterol (low density lipoprotein or LDL) and had better fasting insulin levels than those who regularly ate white flour products. The study was conducted by a team at the Jean Mayer U.S. Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University in Boston and published in this month's American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Lesson learned: Reach for the whole grains.

A Little Help From Your Friends...

Lean Plate Club member (and former caterer) Phyllis Dowdell offers this quick, easy recipe for a refreshing white gazpacho—a great way to enjoy some of those five-a-day servings of fruit and vegetables and a nice alternative to the traditional tomato-based gazpacho:

    3 peeled cucumbers
    1 garlic clove
    3 cups chicken broth
    3 cups nonfat, plain yogurt
    3 tablespoons white vinegar
    salt to taste

Blend ingredients in a food processor or blender. Serve immediately or chill. Garnish with chopped tomatoes, green onions, chopped parsley and a few toasted almonds as desired before serving. Serve cold.

Joy of Motion

An LPCer offered this suggestion as a way of fitting in more daily activity:

New Habits: I vowed to get at least 25 minutes of exercise in a day, so I decided to kill two birds with one stone and exercise with my dog. Every day, before dinner, I take the dog for a long walk through the fields and woods near my house. When I mean walk, I mean power walk. Big dogs take BIG steps. I started slow, but have worked up to 40 minutes each night. I have lost weight, the dog has lost weight, and I feel so much better. The best is even if I wanted to skip the walk, the dog won't let me. How is that for an exercise "buddy?"

Look for more from the Lean Plate Club today in the Washington Post Health Section and at during live Web chat at 1 p.m. at www.washingtonpost.com where you can trade tips, find suggestions, ask nutrition/exercise questions and win free books. Join live or leave questions ahead of time. All questions submitted will be answered either during the chat or afterward offline.

New to the Lean Plate Club? Get previous columns, charts and Web chat transcripts at www.washingtonpost.com/leanplateclub.

The Lean Plate Club is for information only and is not intended to be a substitute for medical care. For specific medical problems, please consult an appropriate health professional. Please forward this free newsletter to family and friends who are interested in establishing healthy habits. Tell them that they can subscribe by visiting http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-
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Weekly Live Online  |  Weekly Column

THIS WEEK IN HEALTH
Tracking Live Organ Donors After Surgery
Safer Home Needle Disposal Sought
Stupid Human Tricks
More in Health
IN CASE YOU MISSED IT
Hormone Therapy Gets New Scrutiny
Federal officials are reassessing all hormone products.
TOOLS & GUIDES
Fast Food Calorie Counter
Body Fat Calculator
Physical Activity & Heart Disease Quiz
Drug-Food Interactions Quiz
Kids Food Quiz: Mealtime Tactics
Quiz: Why Are We Getting Fatter?
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