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Joint U.S.-U.S.S.R. Communique, Vienna, June 18, 1979

By mutual agreement, President of the United States of America Jimmy Carter and General Secretary of the CPSU [Communist Party of the Soviet Union Central Committee and President of the Presidium of the USSR Supreme Soviet Leonid 1. Brezhnev held meetings in Vienna Austria, from June 15 to June 18, 1979. President Carter and President Brezhnev conducted their discussions with the participation of:

On the American side, Cyrus Vance, Secretary of State of the United States of America; Harold Brown, Secretary of Defense of the United States of America; Zbigniew Brzezinski, Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs; and General David Jones, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

On the Soviet side, A. A. Gromyko, Member of the Politburo of the CPSU and Minister of Foreign Affairs; D. F. Ustinov, Member of the Politburo of the CPSU and Minister of Defense; K U. Chernenko Member of the Politburo of the CPSU and Secretary of the Central Committee of the CPSU; and Marshal N. V. Ogarkov, First Deputy Minister of Defense of the USSR and Chief of the General Staff of the Armed Forces of the USSR.

Also participating in the talks were:

On the American side, George Seignious, Director of the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency; Hamilton Jordan, Assistant to the President; Jody Powell, Assistant to the President, Malcolm Toon Ambassador of the United States of America to the USSR, and Ralph Earle, Chief of the US Delegation at the Strategic Arms Limitation Talks.

On the Soviet side, A. M. Aleksandrov, Assistant to the General Secretary of the Central Committee of the CPSU, L. M. Zamyatin Section Chief of the Central Committee of the CPSU, G. M. Korniyenko, First Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs of the USSR, A. F. Dobrynin, Ambassador of the USSR to the United States of America V. G. Komplektov, Member of the Collegium of the Ministry of Foreign

Affairs of the USSR; and V. P. Karpov, Chief of the USSR Delegation at the Strategic Arms Limitation Talks.

President Carter and President Brezhnev signed the Treaty on the Limitation of Strategic Offensive Arms. Basic issues of US-Soviet relations and pressing international problems were also discussed. The exchange of views was characterized by the desire to expand mutual understanding and to find mutually acceptable solutions to problems of interest to both sides. In their discussions they devoted special attention to reducing the risk of war through further limits on strategic arms and through other endeavors in arms limitation and disarmament.

The two sides expressed their appreciation to the Government of Austria for its hospitality and for providing all necessary facilities for the success of the meetings.

I. General Aspects of US-Soviet Relations
There is agreement between the sides that the state of relations between the United States and the Soviet Union is of great importance for the fundamental interests of the peoples of both countries and that it significantly affects the development of the international situation as a whole. Recognizing the great responsibility connected with this, the sides have expressed their firm intent to continue working toward the establishment of a more stable and constructive foundation for US-Soviet relations. To this end, the two sides acknowledged the necessity of expanding areas of cooperation between them.

Such cooperation should be based on the principles of complete equality, equal security, respect for sovereignty and non-intervention in each other's internal affairs, and should facilitate the relaxation of international tension and the peaceful conduct of mutually beneficial relations between states, and thereby enhance international stability and world peace.

The sides reaffirmed their conviction that full implementation of each of the provisions of the "Basic Principles of Relations between the United States of America and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics" as well as other treaties and agreements concluded between them would contribute to a more stable relationship between the two countries.

The two sides stressed the importance of peaceful resolution of disputes, respect for the sovereignty and territorial integrity of states, and of efforts so that conflicts or situations would not arise which could serve to increase international tensions. They recognize the right of the peoples of all states to determine their future without outside interference.

Recognizing that an armed world conflict can and must be avoided the sides believe that at the present time there is no more important and urgent task for mankind than ending the arms race and preventing war. They expressed their intention to make every effort to attain that goal. To that end, they also recognized the value of consultation between themselves and with other governments, at the United Nations and elsewhere, in order to prevent and eliminate conflict in various regions of the world.

The sides note with satisfaction the growing practice of contacts between government officials of the USA and the USSR in the course of which key questions of US-Soviet relations and pressing international issues are discussed. The process of developing useful ties between the US Congress and the Supreme Soviet of the USSR and of exchanges between non-governmental organizations is continuing.

The talks again confirmed the specific significance of personal meetings between the leaders of the USA and the USSR in resolving the basic questions in the relations between the two states. In principle, it has been agreed that such meetings will be held in the future on a regular basis, with the understanding that the specific timing will be determined by mutual agreement.

Agreement has also been reached on broadening the practice of consultations and exchanges of opinion between representatives of the sides on other levels.

II. Limitations of Nuclear and Conventional Arms
The two sides reaffirmed their deep conviction that special importance should be attached to the problems of the prevention of nuclear war and to curbing the competition in strategic arms. Both sides recognized that nuclear war would be a disaster for all mankind. Each stated that it is not striving and will not strive for military superiority. since that can only result in dangerous instability, generating higher levels of armaments with no benefit to the security of either side.

Recognizing that the USA and the USSR have a special responsibility to reduce the risk of nuclear war and contribute to world peace President Carter and President Brezhnev committed themselves to take major steps to limit nuclear weapons with the objective of ultimately eliminating them, and to complete successfully other arms limitation and disarmament negotiations.

SALT. In the course of the meeting, President Carter and President Brezhnev confirmed and signed the Treaty Between the USA and the USSR on the Limitation of Strategic Offensive Arms, the Protocol thereto, the Joint Statement of Principles and Basic Guidelines for Subsequent Negotiations on the Limitation of Strategic Arms and the document entitled Agreed Statements and Common Understandings Regarding the Treaty Between the USA and USSR on the Limitation of Strategic Offensive Arms.'7

At the same time, the sides again stressed the great significance of the Treaty on the Limitation of Anti-Ballistic Missile Systems and strict compliance with its provisions and of other agreements previously concluded between them in the field of strategic arms limitations and reducing the danger of nuclear war.

Both sides express their deep satisfaction with the process of the negotiations on strategic arms limitations and the fact that their persistent efforts for many years to conclude a new treaty have been crowned with success. This treaty sets equal ceilings on the nuclear delivery systems of both sides; to begin the process of reductions it requires the reduction of existing nuclear arms; to begin to limit the threat represented by the qualitative arms race it also places substantial constraints on the modernization of strategic offensive systems and the development of new ones.

The new Treaty on the Limitation of Strategic Offensive Arms and the Protocol thereto represent a mutually acceptable balance between the interests of the sides based on the principles of equality and equal security. These documents are a substantial contribution to the prevention of nuclear war and the deepening of detente, and thus serve the interests not only of the American and Soviet peoples, but the aspirations of mankind for peace.

The two sides reaffirmed their commitment strictly to observe every provision in the treaty.

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