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  •   Excerpts from Md. Governor's Race Poll

    With three months of summer left before Maryland's primary elections for governor, Parris Glendening (D) and Ellen Sauerbrey (R) dominate the challengers in their respective parties, though many voters remain undecided. Putting the two front-runners head to head, Glendening is in the lead among Maryland voters.

    Q: As you may know, the candidates in September's Democratic primary election for governor include Parris Glendening, Terry McGuire, Eileen Rehrmann, and Ray Schoenke. If the election were held today, for whom would you vote?


    Candidate
    Glendening
    Rehrmann
    Schoenke
    McGuire
    Undecided
    Registered
    Democrats
    48%
    10%
    7%
    3%
    32%

    Q: As you may know, the candidates in September's Republican primary election for governor include Ellen Sauerbrey and Charles Ecker. If the election were held today, for whom would you vote?


    Candidate
    Sauerbrey
    Ecker
    Undecided
    Registered
    Republicans
    63%
    13%
    24%

    Q: Now, thinking about the general election for governor which will take place in November, ... suppose that election were being held today and the candidates were Parris Glendening, the Democrat, and Ellen Sauerbrey, the Republican, which one would you vote for?


    Candidate
    Glendening
    Sauerbrey
    Undecided
    Registered
    Voters
    50%
    38%
    12%


    Glendening gets high ratings in two areas often seen as mutually exclusive: looking out for business and handling environmental issues. He also gets goodmarks for his skills as an administrator and for his honesty, but fares much less well as a source of leadership.

    Q: I'm going to read to you some statements people sometimes make about political candidates. And for each, please tell me whether that statement describes [Parris Glendening] very well, fairly well, not too well, or not well at all...    (poll taken among likely voters)



    Very/fairly
    well
    Not too well/
    Not well at all
    No
    opinion
    Looks out for the interests of business 69% 21% 10%
    Is doing a good job handling environmental issues 66% 24% 10%
    Is a good administrator 64% 27% 9%
    Is honest 62% 28% 10%
    Is an inspiring leader 44% 51% 5%


    Slightly more than half of Maryland residents say the state is going in the right direction, a significant improvement over December 1993, when only a third said so. And fully three fourths say the state's economy is in good shape.

    Q: Do you think things in the state of Maryland are generally going in the right direction?


    Right direction
    Wrong track
    No opinion
    Now
    53%
    34%
    13%
    12/93
    33%
    56%
    11%

    Q: Generally speaking, how would you rate the overall economy of Maryland?

    Excellent
    Good
    Not so good
    Poor
    No opinion
    8%
    67%
    17%
    6%
    2%


    State income taxes and crime rates are down in Maryland over the past four years, but the majority of residents have not gotten the news. Almost half say that taxes and crime have increased, rather than decreased. Marylanders are closer to the mark in regard to the welfare caseload and spending on education: half say welfare rolls have decreased, which they have. And half say spending on public schools is up, which is is.



    Increased Decreased Stayed same No opinion
    State income taxes 48% 18% 14% 20%
    Crime rates 47% 39% 6% 8%
    Number of people on welfare 26% 50% 2% 22%
    Spending on public schools 49% 30% 4% 17%
    Respondents were asked whether each had increased or decreased over the past four years, and could also volunteer that each had stayed the same. If they did not know, they were asked for their "best guess."


    The top concern this election season: Education.

    Q: What is the biggest problem facing Maryland today – the one you would want the next governor to work hardest to solve?

    Education
    Crime
    Economy/Unemployment
    Taxes
    Drugs
    24%
    11%
    9%
    9%
    7%


    Names of listed candidates were randomly rotated each time the question was asked so that one candidate's name would not always come first or last. "Likely voters" are those registered voters who say they are "absolutely certain" they will vote in the general election. This Washington Post poll is based on telephone interviews with 1,353 randomly selected adult Maryland residents and was conducted June 11-17. The margin of error for overall results is plus or minus 3 percentage points overall, and larger for subgroups. Sampling error is only one of many potential sources of error in this or any other public opinion poll. Interviewing was conducted by Chilton Research of Horsham, Pa.

    © Copyright 1998 The Washington Post Company

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