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Juvenile Violence Time Line
2000
February 29
icon Mount Morris Township, Michigan:
A first-grader shot and mortally wounded another 6-year-old, one day after the two had quarrelled in the schoolyard, authorities said.

1999
November 16
icon Nathaniel Abraham/AP Pontiac, Michigan:
Nathaniel Abraham, one of the country's youngest murder defendants was convicted of second-degree murder for a shooting that occurred when he was 11.

May 20
icon Conyers, Georgia:
Exactly one month after the Columbine shootings, a 15 year old sophomore with two guns opened fire, wounding six classmates before surrendering to authorities.

April 20
icon Littleton, Colorado:
Two heavily armed young men stormed a suburban Denver high school and, in a shooting rampage on a scale unprecedented in an American school, killed 15 people including themselves and wounded another 28.

1998
icon June 15
Richmond, Virginia:
Quinshawn Booker/AP Quinshawn Booker, 14, is charged as an adult for opening fire in a crowded high school hallway. Booker, who allegedly was angry with another student, is accused of the wounding of a 45-year-old social studies teacher and a 74-year-old Head Start volunteer. Booker pleaded guilty to five charges and will remain at a school for troubled boys until he completes its program.

May 21
icon Springfield, Oregon:
Kipland Kinkel/AP Armed with three guns, 15-year-old Kipland Kinkel (right) allegedly opens fire in a high school cafeteria, killing a student and wounding 19; another student died later. His parents are later found dead in his home. Kinkel pleaded guilty to four counts of murder and 26 of attempted murder. He could be sentenced to as little as 25 years in prison.

May 19
icon Fayetteville, Tennessee:
Jacob Davis/AP Jacob Davis, an 18-year-old honor student (right), awaits trial for fatally shooting a classmate, who was dating his ex-girlfriend, in his school's parking lot.

April 24
icon Edinboro, Pennsylvania:
Andrew Wurst/Reuters A science teacher is shot to death in front of students at middle school graduation dance. Fourteen- year-old Andrew Wurst (right) is charged and will be tried as an adult.

March 24
icon Jonesboro, Arkansas:
Mitchell Johnson/AP Four girls and a teacher are shot to death and 10 others wounded during a false fire alarm at a middle school.
Andrew Golden/AP Thirteen-year-old Mitchell Johnson (top right) and 11-year-old Andrew Golden (right) killed four classmates and a revered teacher were found guilty of capital murder. They were committed to a state detention center under a controversial juvenile sentencing law that will allow them to walk out of jail by their 21st birthdays.

1997
December 1
Michael Carneal/AP icon West Paducah, Kentucky:
Three students are killed and five wounded while praying in a high school hallway. Fourteen- year-old student Michael Carneal (pictured) is arrested and pleads guilty but mentally ill on Oct. 5 to three counts of murder and six other charges related to the shooting spree. Carneal was sentenced Dec. 17 to life in prison without possibility of parole for 25 years

October 1
Luke Woodham/AP icon Pearl, Mississippi:
Sixteen-year-old Luke Woodham stabs his mother to death, then goes to his high school and shoots nine students. Two die, including the suspect's ex-girlfriend, seven others are wounded. Authorities accused six friends of conspiracy. Woodham was convicted as an adult in June 1998 and is serving three life sentences.

1996
February 2
icon Moses Lake, Washington:
Barry Loukaitis, 14, walks into a junior high algebra class and opens fire with Barry Loukaitis/AP a hunting rifle, killing the teacher and two students and wounding one other student. In October 1997, Loukaitis was convicted of two counts of aggravated first-degree murder and sentenced to two mandatory life terms without parole.

© 2000 The Washington Post Company

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