Super Tuesday Caucuses and Conventions

Most Super Tuesday states are holding primaries on Feb. 5. But a handful of states are holding caucuses or conventions instead. Here's a rundown for how the winners of the caucuses will be selected:

Alaska: Both parties are holding caucuses on Feb. 5. Democrats will select delegates to the state convention on the basis of presidential preference. Republicans, however, will cast a binding vote at their caucuses, which delegates to the national convention awarded proportionally. Results: Dems | GOP | More information: Dems | GOP

Colorado: Both parties are holding caucuses on Feb. 5. Attendees gather at caucus locations to declare their support for a candidate. Caucus-goers dedicated to any candidate who does not meet a certain threshold of support will then have to declare their support for a second choice candidate. Delegates elected at the caucuses will gather later in the year at county and state conventions to award delegates to the national conventions. Results: Dems | GOP | More information: Dems | GOP

Idaho: Only Democrats are holding caucuses, and the caucuses are open to any eligible voter (Republicans and independents included). The process works much like the Iowa caucuses, where attendees gather at a caucus site to declare their support for a candidate. Caucus-goers dedicated to any candidate who does not meet a 15 percent threshold of support will then have to declare their support for a second choice candidate. Delegates elected at the caucuses will gather later in the year at a state convention to award delegates to the national convention. Results | More information

Kansas: Only Democrats are holding caucuses. The process works much like the Iowa caucuses, where attendees gather at a caucus site to declare their support for a candidate. Caucus-goers dedicated to any candidate who does not meet a 15 percent threshold of support will then have to declare their support for a second choice candidate. Delegates elected at the caucuses will gather later in the year at a state convention to award delegates to the national convention. Results | More information

Minnesota: Democrats and Republicans gather at caucus sites to cast ballots for the presidential candidate of their choice. The vote is binding on Democratic delegates, which will be awarded proportionally, but the GOP caucus results are nonbinding. Results: Dems | GOP | More information: Dems | GOP

Montana: Only Republicans are caucusing on Feb. 5, and only a small number of Republicans are eligible to vote -- mainly local elected officials and party organizers. Caucus-goers will gather in each of the state's 56 counties, and the candidate who wins the most counties will get all of the state's convention delegates. Results | More information

New Mexico: Only Democrats are voting on Feb. 5. Eligible voters will cast paper ballots, and delegates will be awarded based on how a candidate performs in each of the state's three congressional districts. Results | More information

North Dakota: The two parties will open caucus sites across the state. Voters will cast paper ballots, and both parties will award delegates proportionally (unless a candidate receives two-thirds or more of the vote, in which case he/she would be awarded all of them). Results: Dems | GOP | More information: Dems | GOP

West Virginia: Delegates elected at the county level will gather in Charleston on Feb. 5 for a state convention. Delegates will gather in groups divided by county to select which GOP candidate they support. Whichever candidate wins a majority of counties at the convention will win 18 delegates to the Republican National Convention. A handful of other delegates will be selected in the state's May primary. View results | More information.

About the Nevada 2008 Democratic Caucus Results

The Nevada Democratic Party is not reporting votes for its Jan. 19 caucuses. Instead, the party will only release the number of county delegates won by each presidential candidate (or "Uncommitted"). This is the data being collected by the Associated Press and displayed on washingtonpost.com. There will be at least 10,446 delegates to the county conventions in the state's 17 counties. (More information here.)

On the Republican side, the party caucuses are essentially a straw poll. Thus, the votes reported by the party and collected by AP are actual votes. (More information here.)

About the Iowa 2008 Caucus Results

The Democrats

Instead of reporting the actual number of caucus voters, the Iowa Democratic Party releases an estimated number of delegates to the state party convention that each candidate will receive, based on their proportional support in the caucuses. The delegates at the state convention select delegates to the national convention in July.

Because Iowa Democrats do not tally actual votes from participants, the caucus results are often expressed as percentages. In 2004, John Kerry won the Iowa caucuses with 37 percent of the vote; Al Gore won with 63 percent in 2000. As noted above, the actual "votes" reported by the party on caucus night are really the number of delegates to the state convention awarded to each winner. In 2004, John Kerry won 1,128 votes, and in 2000 Gore won 1,269 votes.

More information is available on the Web site of the Iowa Democratic Party.

The Republicans

Iowa Republicans also gather at caucuses, where attendees cast a straw vote for the candidate of their choice. The votes are tallied as in any standard election. In 2000, George W. Bush won the Iowa caucuses with 35,000+ votes.

More information is available on the Web site of the Iowa Republican Party.

Additional note about results: Rep. Tom Tancredo withdrew from the GOP presidential race last month. However, his name will remain on the ballots used by Iowa Republicans at the Jan. 3 caucuses. The state party will report any votes for Tancredo along with the other candidates. Tancredo has endorsed Mitt Romney.

Other Resources

Iowa Caucus 2008

Iowa Caucus Experience

Iowa Secretary of State

Des Moines Register Caucus Guide

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