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THE IMPEACHMENT TRIAL
Feb. 4: Closing Remarks

  • More Transcripts From the Trial

  • From the Congressional Record
    Thursday, February 4, 1999

    ORDERS FOR SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 6 AND MONDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1999

    Mr. LOTT. Mr. Chief Justice, I believe that completes all the motions. Therefore, I ask unanimous consent that when the Senate completes its business today, it stand in adjournment until 10 a.m. on Saturday, February 6, and at 10 a.m. on Saturday, immediately following the prayer, the Senate will resume consideration of the articles of impeachment. I further ask consent that on Saturday there be 6 hours equally divided between the House managers and White House counsel for presentations. I further ask that following those presentations on Saturday, the Senate then adjourn until 1 p.m. on Monday, February 8. I finally ask consent that on Monday, immediately following the prayer, the Senate resume consideration of the articles of impeachment, and there then be 6 hours equally divided between the managers and White House counsel for final arguments.

    Mr. LEAHY. Mr. Chief Justice, reserving the right to object, and I shall not, I ask the distinguished leader this. We have had exhibits handed out today to be printed in the Congressional Record, referring to depositions which, I understand under rule XXIX, are still confidential. Are those to be printed in the Record?

    Mr. LOTT. I will ask consent that the transcripts of the depositions be printed in the Record of today's date.

    Mr. LEAHY. The exhibits were handed out today in debate. Were they handed out under rule XXIX?

    Mr. LOTT. I believe we got approval that they be used in the oral presentations at the beginning of the session today.

    Mr. LEAHY. I withdraw any objection.

    Mr. CHIEF JUSTICE. Objection has been heard.

    Mr. LEAHY. Mr. Chief Justice, I withdrew any objection.

    Mr. KERRY addressed the Chair.

    The CHIEF JUSTICE. The Senator from Massachusetts, Mr. Kerry, is recognized.

    Mr. KERRY. Mr. Chief Justice, reserving the right to object. I ask the majority leader, is there an assumption that if White House counsel were to want sufficient time on Saturday in order to be able to present video testimony countering whatever surprise video--and there may or may not be a surprise --would they have time to be able to provide that on Saturday--not to carry over, but merely if they choose to, to do that on Saturday?

    Mr. LOTT. I am not sure I understand the question, except that we will come in at 10, and we will have 6 hours equally divided. I presume that the House would make a presentation first and then the White House and then close. There would be time during that 6-hour period for the White House to use it as they see fit. Are you asking that there would be some sort of break so they would be able to consider that?

    Mr. KERRY. Clearly, the purpose of the trial and the purpose of this effort is to have a fair presentation of evidence. The Senate now having denied notice to White House counsel of what areas may be the subject of video, it might be that the voice of the witnesses themselves is the best response to whatever it is that the House were to present. If they were to decide----

    Mr. BROWNBACK. Mr. Chief Justice, I call for the regular order.

    The CHIEF JUSTICE. The regular order has been called for. There is a unanimous consent request pending. Is there objection?

    Mr. LOTT. Mr. Chief Justice, briefly, if I could say on behalf of my unanimous consent, and in brief response to the question, we have all worked hard and bent over backward trying to be fair. I am sure if there is something that would be needed on Saturday, it would be carefully considered by both sides.

    Mr. KERRY. Mr. Chief Justice, I suggest the absence of a quorum.

    Mr. GRAMM. A quorum is present.

    The CHIEF JUSTICE. The majority leader has the floor.

    Mr. LOTT. Mr. Chief Justice, I believe it would be appropriate to go ahead and get this unanimous consent agreement. We will continue to work with both sides to try to make sure there is a fair way to proceed on Saturday. We will have the remainder of today and tomorrow to work on that. So I would like to renew my unanimous consent request.

    The CHIEF JUSTICE. Is there objection?

    Mr. BOND. Mr. Chief Justice, reserving the right to object. May I inquire of the majority leader if that Saturday time schedule gives both parties adequate time to prepare for the presentation of the evidence? Have both sides agreed that they will be prepared?

    Mr. LOTT. Mr. Chief Justice, as best I can respond to that, I just say that hopefully both sides have had more than adequate time allocated on Saturday. One of the reasons we are doing it this way--Saturday instead of tomorrow--is so both sides will have an opportunity to review everything and hopefully communicate with each other. We will do that Friday during the day so that an orderly presentation can be made by both sides on Saturday. I believe we are seeing a problem here where there may not be one.

    But if one develops certainly we would take it into consideration.

    Mr. Chief Justice, I renew my request.

    The CHIEF JUSTICE. Is there objection? In the absence of objection, it is so ordered.

    Mr. LOTT. Mr. Chief Justice, I ask unanimous consent that those parts of the transcripts of the depositions admitted into evidence be printed in the Congressional Record of today's date.

    I further ask consent that the deposition transcripts of Monica Lewinsky, Vernon Jordan, and Sidney Blumenthal, and the videotapes thereof, be immediately released to the managers on the part of the House and the counsel to the President for the purpose of preparing their presentations, provided, however, that such copies shall remain at all times under the supervision of the Sergeant at Arms to ensure compliance with the confidentiality provisions of S. Res. 30.

    The CHIEF JUSTICE. In the absence of objection, it is so ordered.

       


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