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THE IMPEACHMENT TRIAL
Jan. 7: The Managers Arrive

  • More Transcripts From the Trial

  • From the Congressional Record
    Thursday, January 7, 1999

    At 10:05 a.m., the managers on the part of the House of Representatives of the impeachment of William Jefferson Clinton appeared below the bar of the Senate, and the Sergeant at Arms, James W. Ziglar, announced their presence, as follows:

    Mr. President and Members of the Senate, I announce the presence of the managers on the part of the House of Representatives to conduct the proceedings on behalf of the House concerning the impeachment of William Jefferson Clinton, President of the United States.

    The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The managers on the part of the House will be received and escorted to the well of the Senate.

    The managers were thereupon escorted by the Sergeant at Arms of the Senate, James W. Ziglar, to the well of the Senate.

    The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The Sergeant at Arms will make the proclamation.

    The Sergeant at Arms, James W. Ziglar, made the proclamation, as follows:

    Hear ye! Hear ye! Hear ye! All persons are commanded to keep silent, on pain of imprisonment, while the House of Representatives is exhibiting to the Senate of the United States articles of impeachment against William Jefferson Clinton, President of the United States.

    The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The managers on the part of the House will proceed.

    Mr. Manager HYDE. Mr. President, the managers on the part of the House of Representatives are here present and ready to present the articles of impeachment which have been preferred by the House of Representatives against William Jefferson Clinton, President of the United States.

    The House adopted the following resolution, which with the permission of the Senate I will read.

    House Resolution 10

    Resolved, That in continuance of the authority conferred in House Resolution 614 of the One Hundred Fifth Congress adopted by the House of Representatives and delivered to the Senate on December 19, 1998, Mr. Hyde of Illinois, Mr. Sensenbrenner of Wisconsin, Mr. McCollum of Florida, Mr. Gekas of Pennsylvania, Mr. Canady of Florida, Mr. Buyer of Indiana, Mr. Bryant of Tennessee, Mr. Chabot of Ohio, Mr. Barr of Georgia, Mr. Hutchinson of Arkansas, Mr. Cannon of Utah, Mr. Rogan of California, and Mr. Graham of South Carolina are appointed managers to conduct the impeachment trial against William Jefferson Clinton, President of the United States, that a message be sent to the Senate to inform the Senate of these appointments, and that the managers so appointed may, in connection with the preparation and the conduct of the trial, exhibit the articles of impeachment to the Senate and take all other actions necessary, which may include the following:

    (1) Employing legal, clerical, and other necessary assistants and incurring such other expenses as may be necessary, to be paid from amounts available to the Committee on the Judiciary under applicable expense resolutions or from the applicable accounts of the House of Representatives.

    (2) Sending for persons and papers, and filing with the Secretary of the Senate, on the part of the House of Representatives, any pleadings, in conjunction with or subsequent to, the exhibition of the articles of impeachment that the managers consider necessary.

    With the permission of the Senate, I will now read the articles of impeachment, House Resolution 611.

    House Resolution 611


    Resolved, That William Jefferson Clinton, President of the United States, is impeached for high crimes and misdemeanors, and that the following articles of impeachment be exhibited to the United States Senate:
    Articles of impeachment exhibited by the House of Representatives of the United States of America in the name of itself and of the people of the United States of America, against William Jefferson Clinton, President of the United States of America, in maintenance and support of its impeachment against him for high crimes and misdemeanors.

    Article I
    In his conduct while President of the United States, William Jefferson Clinton, in violation of his constitutional oath faithfully to execute the office of President of the United States and, to the best of his ability, preserve, protect, and defend the Constitution of the United States, and in violation of his constitutional duty to take care that the laws be faithfully executed, has willfully corrupted and manipulated the judicial process of the United States for his personal gain and exoneration, impeding the administration of justice, in that:
    On August 17, 1998, William Jefferson Clinton swore to tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth before a Federal grand jury of the United States. Contrary to that oath, William Jefferson Clinton willfully provided perjurious, false and misleading testimony to the grand jury concerning one or more of the following: (1) the nature and details of his relationship with a subordinate Government employee; (2) prior perjurious, false and misleading testimony he gave in a Federal civil rights action brought against him; (3) prior false and misleading statements he allowed his attorney to make to a Federal judge in that civil rights action; and (4) his corrupt efforts to influence the testimony of witnesses and to impede the discovery of evidence in that civil rights action.
    In doing this, William Jefferson Clinton has undermined the integrity of his office, has brought disrepute on the Presidency, has betrayed his trust as President, and has acted in a manner subversive of the rule of law and justice, to the manifest injury of the people of the United States.
    Wherefore, William Jefferson Clinton, by such conduct, warrants impeachment and trial, and removal from office and disqualification to hold and enjoy any office of honor, trust, or profit under the United States.

    Article II
    In his conduct while President of the United States, William Jefferson Clinton, in violation of his constitutional oath faithfully to execute the office of President of the United States and, to the best of his ability, preserve, protect, and defend the Constitution of the United States, and in violation of his constitutional duty to take care that the laws be faithfully executed, has prevented, obstructed, and impeded the administration of justice, and has to that end engaged personally, and through his subordinates and agents, in a course of conduct or scheme designed to delay, impede, cover up, and conceal the existence of evidence and testimony related to a Federal civil rights action brought against him in a duly instituted judicial proceeding.
    The means used to implement this course of conduct or scheme included one or more of the following acts:

    (1) On or about December 17, 1997, William Jefferson Clinton corruptly encouraged a witness in a Federal civil rights action brought against him to execute a sworn affidavit in that proceeding that he knew to be perjurious, false and misleading.

    (2) On or about December 17, 1997, William Jefferson Clinton corruptly encouraged a witness in a Federal civil rights action brought against him to give perjurious, false and misleading testimony if and when called to testify personally in that proceeding.

    (3) On or about December 28, 1997, William Jefferson Clinton corruptly engaged in, encouraged, or supported a scheme to conceal evidence that had been subpoenaed in a Federal civil rights action brought against him.

    (4) Beginning on or about December 7, 1997, and continuing through and including January 14, 1998, William Jefferson Clinton intensified and succeeded in an effort to secure job assistance to a witness in a Federal civil rights action brought against him in order to corruptly prevent the truthful testimony of that witness in that proceeding at a time when the truthful testimony of that witness would have been harmful to him.

    (5) On January 17, 1998, at his deposition in a Federal civil rights action brought against him, William Jefferson Clinton corruptly allowed his attorney to make false and misleading statements to a Federal judge characterizing an affidavit, in order to prevent questioning deemed relevant by the judge. Such false and misleading statements were subsequently acknowledged by his attorney in a communication to that judge.

    (6) On or about January 18 and January 20-21, 1998, William Jefferson Clinton related a false and misleading account of events relevant to a Federal civil rights action brought against him to a potential witness in that proceeding, in order to corruptly influence the testimony of that witness.

    (7) On or about January 21, 23, and 26, 1998, William Jefferson Clinton made false and misleading statements to potential witnesses in a Federal grand jury proceeding in order to corruptly influence the testimony of those witnesses. The false and misleading statements made by William Jefferson Clinton were repeated by the witnesses to the grand jury, causing the grand jury to receive false and misleading information.
    In all of this, William Jefferson Clinton has undermined the integrity of his office, has brought disrepute on the Presidency, has betrayed his trust as President, and has acted in a manner subversive of the rule of law and justice, to the manifest injury of the people of the United States.
    Wherefore, William Jefferson Clinton, by such conduct, warrants impeachment and trial, and removal from office and disqualification to hold and enjoy any office of honor, trust, or profit under the United States.

    Passed the House of Representatives December 19, 1998. Newt Gingrich, Speaker of the House of Representatives. Attest: Robin H. Carle, Clerk.

    Mr. President, that completes the exhibition of the articles of impeachment against William Jefferson Clinton, President of the United States. The managers request that the Senate take order for the trial. The managers now request leave to withdraw.

    The PRESIDENT pro tempore. Thank you, Mr. Manager Hyde. The Senate will notify the House of Representatives when it is ready to proceed.

    Mr. LOTT addressed the Chair.

    The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The majority leader is recognized.

    UNANIMOUS CONSENT-AGREEMENT

    Mr. LOTT. Mr. President, I modify my previous request and ask unanimous consent that the Presiding Officer be authorized to appoint a committee of six Senators, three upon the recommendation of the majority leader and three upon the recommendation of the Democratic leader, to escort the Chief Justice into the Senate Chamber.

    The PRESIDENT pro tempore. Without objection, it is so ordered.

    RECESS

    Mr. LOTT. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that the Senate stand in recess until the hour of 12:45 today. Before the Chair rules on this request, I say as a reminder to all Senators that at 1 p.m. today, following a live quorum, the Chief Justice and all Senators will be sworn in. I thank all Senators.

    There being no objection, the Senate, at 10:16 a.m., recessed; whereupon, at 12:49 p.m., the Senate reassembled when called to order by the President pro tempore.

    Mr. LOTT addressed the Chair.

    The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The majority leader is recognized.

       


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