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Obama's War

Combating Extremism in Afghanistan and Pakistan

U.S., NATO to announce 'transition' strategy

afghanistan

Even as it announces the "transition" process, NATO will also state its intention to keep combat troops in Afghanistan until 2014, a date originally set by Afghan President Hamid Karzai.
» PHOTOS: Images from the war in Afghanistan
» For NATO, new realities bring new strategy
» Embattled Inspector General for Afghan war called to testify

Karzai: reduce U.S. military presence

In an interview with The Washington Post, Afghanistan President Hamid Karzai said that he wanted American troops off the roads and out of Afghan homes.

Obama awards Medal of Honor

VIDEO | Salvatore Giunta, an Army staff sergeant who stepped into the line of fire to help a pair of comrades on the Afghan battlefield, was awarded the Medal of Honor in a White House ceremony Nov. 16.

Deciding on a surge strategy
mission in afghanistan
Hours of meetings exposed opposing views among administration and military officials, and shifted Obama's thinking toward a swift military escalation and exit strategy.
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combat generation
How a decade at war is changing the U.S. military.
Evolving war
Timeline of U.S. involvement in Afghanistan since 2001.
impact of war
Experts and everyday people come together to talk about how the war has changed their lives.
Faces of the Fallen
Searchable database of U.S. service members killed in Iraq and Afghanistan.
National Security
Washington Post coverage of U.S. government efforts to protect the country.
afghan elections
Afghanistan voted for president on Aug. 20, 2009.
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About This Series

Afghanistan faces grave challenges politically and economically. The Washington Post follows the U.S. military and the Obama administration as they try to turn around the deteriorating situation in Afghanistan and prevent the spread of extremist groups across the border in Pakistan.

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