Incomplete housing projects

Across the country, hundreds of housing projects funded by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development are stalled or abandoned.

Explore the projects below to see stories and panoramas of each site.

$350,000 in funding (2005)

Naylor Rd., Temple Hills, Md.

In 2005, Prince George's County delivered $350,000 in federal funds to the nonprofit Kairos Development Corp, which proposed to build 56 condominiums on this empty lot. But Kairos did not own the land or have permission to build on it. The owners of the property ultimately decided not to sell to Kairos. Six years later, the lot is still empty and the affordable-housing deal is dead. A Kairos official said the project became "unfeasible due to significant change in selling prices." The county wrote off the loan.

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$700,000 in funding (2003)

Avon Ave., Newark

In 2003, Newark housing officials delivered $700,000 to a developer who promised to build a series of houses for the poor. But the developer fought with the general contractor and did not have the funding to move forward. Housing officials recently terminated the project and are trying to recoup the federal money. "The public has not gotten what it intended to get when we started these projects," said Newark's new housing chief, Michael Meyer.

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$5.5 million in funding (2006)

West Lincoln Ave., Anaheim, Calif.

Since 2006, housing officials in Anaheim invested a total of $5.5 million in federal funding to buy and build housing on this lot. But the developer doesn't have the money to move forward. Housing officials say they are hoping the developer can quickly secure funding to start construction.

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$1.7 million in funding (2001)

Monticello St., Nashville, Tenn.

Since 2001, the Metropolitan Development and Housing Agency of Nashville invested $1.7 million in this delayed project, meant to provide about 40 homes for low-income families. Federal money was spent to buy land and put in roads and utilities, but there is no money to start construction. "We essentially kind of moth-balled it for the moment," said Joe Cain, director of development. "We are holding it."

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$140,000 in funding (2006)

3rd St., Orange, Texas

In 2006, housing officials in Orange delivered $140,000 in federal funds to a nonprofit developer that promised to build 50 houses on this lot and others. But the developer never had the money to start construction, and six years later, no homes have gone up. Housing officials said they have not been able to recoup the federal funds. "They went belly up on us," said Jimmie Lewis, director of planning and community development. "It's been a nightmare."

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$270,000 in funding (2002)

Berwyn St., East Orange, N.J.

Housing officials delivered $270,000 to build houses on this lot and others. A nonprofit developer did some planning and environmental work, but eventually went under. Nearly a decade later, the project is incomplete. "Everything takes so damn long," said East Orange Mayor Robert Bowser. "There are so many complications."

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SOURCE: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and local housing agencies.

GRAPHIC: Wilson Andrews and Debbie Cenziper - The Washington Post. Published May 15, 2011.