Amount spent by all agencies (in millions)

Click on a state or use the search box below to see how agencies reported their spending

National Spending Breakdown

Federal guidelines call for the money to go for law enforcement. In documents obtained by The Washington Post through a Freedom of Information Act request, police agencies reported their spending in broad categories. Their reports include few details on specific purchases, and local officials decide how to categorize their spending. They most often choose the category "Other."

CATEGORY

SPENDING

Other

$1,013,021,564

Communications and computers

$436,160,095

Building and improvements

$261,734,502

Salaries and overtime

$215,768,183

Weapons

$177,298,543

Electronic surveillance

$127,126,776

Travel and training

$116,743,250

Information and rewards

$102,358,231

Community-based programs

$20,346,040

Highlights

Federal civil forfeiture money has been spent on investigative expenses like drug buys, informants and overtime, as well as equipment, training, awards, memorials and community programs like drug abuse treatment. These examples are taken from documents and interviews.

BearCat armored personnel carrier
Douglasville Police Department, Ga.

$227,390

27 M-4 assault rifles
Braselton Police Department, Ga.

$54,000

Helicopter
Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department, Ca.

$4.97 million

Command Bus
Prince George's County Police Department, Md.

$1.2 million

Challenge coins
Brunswick County Sheriff, NC

$5,310

Coffeemaker
Randall County Sheriff, Texas

$637

Sparkles the Clown
community relations program
Reminderville Police Department, Ohio

$225

High Times magazine subscription
Metrich Enforcement Unit, Ohio

$30

Methodology: Spending figures were compiled from annual reports submitted since 2008 by local and state police agencies to the U.S. Justice Department’s Equitable Sharing Program. The program allows the agencies to keep and spend up to 80 percent of assets seized in civil forfeitures. Agencies self-report their spending in the broad categories shown on this page.


SOURCE: A Washington Post analysis of Department of Justice data.