Gerrymandered? Maryland voters to decide

Question 5 on Maryland's November ballot asks voters to affirm or reject the way Gov. Martin O'Malley (D) and Democrats in the General Assembly used Census data to redraw the state's eight congressional districts for the next 10 years. Republicans organized the petition drive to place the measure on the ballot. The map has been criticized for splitting minority communities in Washington-area suburbs to position a Democrat to win the GOP-held 6th District. Statewide, the plan will give at least 1.6 million people a different representative in Congress. Here’s a look at how the districts change.

Districts

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The district expands westward along the state's northern border. It gains some white and Republican voters, and becomes the state's most Republican district.

Some 276,000 people move in and out of District 2, but its racial, ethnic and political changed little.

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District 3 was widely redrawn, and a third of its residents were imported from other districts. The share of the Hispanic and Asian populations increases about two percentage points, and declines the same for whites.

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More than 600,000 people move in and out of this district. It gains residents in Anne Arundel and Prince George's counties, and loses them in Montgomery. White population share increases by seven percentage points. Democratic voters remain a majority.

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District 5 is the least changed by the governor's redistricting effort.

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Until now the state's most Republican district, it becomes majority Democratic. Adds minorities, mostly from District 8 and Montgomery County, pushes the white share of population down 21 percentage points. It loses people to Frederick and Carroll.

The district changes in Baltimore and Howard County. It gaines some white population and Republican voters, but Democrats appear to be a majority.

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The district has a net gain of 115,000 white residents, most from Frederick and Carroll counties. It sees a net loss of 119,000 minorities, mostly from Montgomery County.

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SOURCES: Post analysis of 2008 election returns, U.S. Census data, Maryland Department of Planning. GRAPHIC: Ted Mellnik, Cristina Rivero and Gene Thorp - The Washington Post. Updated Sept. 27, 2012.