The Mitchell Report: Naming Names

Since former Senate majority leader George J. Mitchell was appointed in March 2006 to investigate the use of performance-enhancing drugs in the sport, baseball has been consumed by rumors and speculation as to which players might be named in the report. With the release of the report Thursday, we finally have answers.

Here's a list of some of the most prominent players named in the probe -- which dealt some players more serious allegations than had been reported, but did not provide new information on several big names.

Full list of the 91 players cited in the probe.

Rick Ankiel, Cardinals Was second in NL rookie of the year voting in 2000
Previously Reported: Received eight shipments of human growth hormone (HGH) from January to December 2004, according to a report in the New York Daily News in September. Earlier this month, the commissioner's office said Ankiel would not be punished because of "insufficient evidence."
In the Report: Allegations made in the New York Daily News report and Ankiel’s meeting with the commissioner’s office in September are reiterated, but no new information is revealed.
Barry Bonds, Giants Baseball's all-time home run leader
Previously Reported: Subject of a San Francisco Chronicle investigation and book that detailed his alleged use of steroids and HGH; indicted in November on charges of lying to federal investigators over the alleged drug use.
In the Report: Allegations made in the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative (BALCO) investigations are reiterated, but Mitchell's probe did not reveal substantive new information about Bonds' alleged use of performance-enhancers.
Paul Byrd, Indians Veteran starting pitcher
Previously Reported: Admitted using HGH after a San Francisco Chronicle report brought the drug use to light in October, but said he used HGH to treat a tumor in his pituitary gland.
In the Report: Allegations made in the San Francisco Chronicle report and Byrd’s response are reiterated, but no new information is revealed.
Jose Canseco, retired AL MVP in 1988
Previously Reported: Called himself "godfather of steroids in baseball" after writing a tell-all book in 2005 in which he admitted using steroids. Book also implicated former teammates such as Mark McGwire, Jason Giambi and Juan Gonzalez.
In the Report: FBI Agent Gregory Stejskal told investigators that he notified Kevin Hallinan of the Commissioner's Office's security department in 1995 that a nationwide probe had turned up the names of major leaguers, including Canseco, who were using steroids. Hallinan said he did not remember being approached by Stejskal in 1995. Also, Canseco attorney Robert Saunooke confirmed that Canseco had purchased HGH over the internet on several occasions, both before and after his retirement from baseball.
Roger Clemens, Yankees Seven-time Cy Young Award winner
Previously Reported: Accused of performance-enhancing drug use by former teammate Jason Grimsley in a federal affidavit in 2006, according to the Los Angeles Times. The day after the Times report, the U.S. attorney's office in Northern California said it contained "significant inaccuracies," but did not elaborate.
In the Report: Brian McNamee, a former major league strength and conditioning coach, said he injected Clemens with steroids in 1998 and 2000 and HGH in 2000. in 1998, McNamee said that Clemens told him that the steroids "had a pretty good effect" on him.
Eric Gagné, Brewers Won NL Cy Young Award in 2003
Previously Reported:No known reports.
In the Report: Kirk Radomski, a former New York Mets clubhouse employee, said that he mailed two shipments of human growth hormone to Gagné. The report includes Radomski's mailing receipt showing a shipment to Gagné at Dodger Stadium; and two checks sent to the trainer for $3,200 each -- all for HGH, Radomski said. The report also excerpts an email sent to a scout by Red Sox General Manager Theo Epstein as the team considered acquiring Gagne in late 2006: "Have you done any digging on Gagné?" Epstein asked. "I know the Dodgers think he was a steroid guy."
Jason Giambi, Yankees AL MVP in 2000
Previously Reported: Admitted to a grand jury in 2003 that he used steroids obtained through BALCO, according to San Francisco Chronicle reports.
In the Report: Giambi, the only current major leaguer to cooperate with the inverstigation, said he began using anabolic steroids in 2001 and injected Deca-Durabolin weekly in the 2001 and 2002 seasons. After meeting Bonds' personal trainer, Greg Anderson, in November 2002, he followed a regimen set by Anderson, including use of "the clear" and "the cream" through the 2003 All-Star break.
Jay Gibbons, Orioles Averaged 25 HR per 162 games in seven seasons
Previously Reported: Purchased HGH and steroids from an alleged illegal distribution ring being investigated by the district attorney's office in Albany, N.Y., according to media reports. Suspended for 15 games by the commissioner on Dec. 6 for using performance-enhancing drugs and subsequently admitted using HGH.
In the Report: Media reports are restated, with the addition of a comment regarding Gibbons made during an October 2003 meeting between Dodgers officials: "Gibbons is a guy [we] would have interest in but juice involved there."
Juan Gonzalez, retired AL MVP in 1996 and 1998
Previously Reported: Tabbed by Canseco as a steroid user in his 2005 book; denied his former teammate's accusations. Also, Gonzalez and his trainer, Angel Presinal, were linked to a bag containing steroids discovered in October 2001 by Canadian Border Service agents at the Toronto airport, according to a New York Daily News report in July 2006. Presinal told police that the bag had been packed by Gonzalez, then with the Indians.
In the Report: Hallinan told Indians resident security agent Jim Davidson that his office would investigate the matter, but the report states that there is no evidence that such an investigation ever was conducted beyond a search for Presinal's Cleveland address. The report contains no other information about alleged drug use by Gonzalez.
Jason Grimsley, retired Relief pitcher from 1989 to 2006
Previously Reported: Admitted he had used HGH and steroids, according to a federal search warrant affidavit filed in 2006. Accused several teammates of performance-enhancing drug use in the affidavit, according to the Los Angeles Times.
In the Report: The investigation found 14 checks written to Radomski by Grimsley (including cashier’s checks for which Grimsley was the remitter) from June 2, 2001 through July 29, 2005, totaling $35,400. Radomski said he had sold Grimsley HGH and steroids.
Jose Guillen, Royals Played with Nationals in 2005 and 2006
Previously Reported: Purchased HGH and steroids from an alleged illegal distribution ring being investigated by the district attorney's office in Albany, N.Y., according to media reports. Suspended for 15 games by the commissioner on Dec. 6 for using performance-enhancing drugs. Said he would appeal suspension.
In the Report: Information from media reports is reiterated, but no new information on Guillen's alleged drug use is revealed.
Paul Lo Duca, Nationals Four-time All-Star
Previously Reported: No known reports.
In the Report: Radomski estimated that he engaged in six or more sales of HGH with Lo Duca. The report also detailed checks from Lo Duca to Radomski and notes from Dodgers officials when they were considering trading him in October 2003, including "Got off the steroids . . . Took away a lot of hard line drives."
Mark McGwire, retired Hit then-record 70 home runs in 1998.
Previously Reported: Admitted in 1998 to using androstenedione, a steroid precursor that was legal at the time. Named as a steroid-user by Canseco, a former teammate, in a 2005 book. Declined to comment on whether he used of performance-enhancing drugs during Congressional hearings in 2005.
In the Report: The controversies surrounding McGwire are mentioned, but no new information on McGwire's alleged drug use is revealed.
Andy Pettitte, Yankees Ace starting pitcher on World Series winner in '96, '98, '99 and 2000
Previously Reported: Accused of performance-enhancing drug use by former teammate Grimsley in a federal affidavit in 2006, according to the Los Angeles Times. The day after the Times report, the U.S. attorney's office in Northern California said it contained "significant inaccuracies," but did not elaborate.
In the Report: McNamee told investigators that Pettitte had asked him about HGH twice, and he injected Pettitte with HGH on two to four occasions in 2002 while the pitcher was rehabilitating an elbow injury.
Brian Roberts, Orioles Two-time All-Star
Previously Reported: Accused of performance-enhancing drug use by former teammate Grimsley in a federal affidavit in 2006, according to the Los Angeles Times. The day after the Times report, the U.S. attorney's office in Northern California said it contained "significant inaccuracies," but did not elaborate.
In the Report: Former Oriole Larry Bigbie said Roberts admitted to him in 2004 that he had injected himself once or twice with steroids in 2003. Bigbie said he had never seen Roberts use steroids, nor did he suspect Roberts of using steroids until the admission. In the report, Mitchell writes that he asked Roberts to meet with him; Roberts declined.
David Segui, retired Played eight of his 15 seasons with Orioles
Previously Reported: Admitted that he experimented with anabolic steroids during his career and said that he used HGH with a legal prescription from a Florida doctor.
In the Report: Radomski said he began selling Deca-Durabolin to Segui in 1995. Radomski produced six checks drawn on Segui's checking account that were deposited into Radomski's checking account. Radomski said he engaged in more than 12 transactions with Segui and dealt with him more than any other player.
Gary Sheffield, Tigers Nine-time All-Star
Previously Reported: Admitted to a grand jury in 2003 that he used steroids obtained through BALCO, according to San Francisco Chronicle reports.
In the Report: The report reiterates Sheffield's grand jury testimony but contains no evidence that Sheffield used performance-enhancing substances beyond 2005, when MLB initiated a new steroids policy.
Miguel Tejada, Astros AL MVP in 2002
Previously Reported: Accused of performance-enhancing drug use by former teammate Grimsley in a federal affidavit in 2006, according to the Los Angeles Times. The day after the Times report, the U.S. attorney's office in Northern California said it contained "significant inaccuracies," but did not elaborate.
In the Report: Former major leaguer Adam Piatt told investigators that he provided Tejada with testosterone or Deca-Durabolin, as well as HGH. Piatt emphasized that he did not know whether Tejada actually used the substances. The report also contained copies of checks written by Tejada to Piatt for $3,100 and $3,200.
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