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Venus Williams
AFP Photo
SUNDAY'S ACTION
Hingis Wins Battle of Ages, Cruises to Women's Title
Martina Hingis concluded a dominating run through the U.S. Open women's field Sunday, routing teenage phenom Venus Williams (pictured), 6-0, 6-4, to win her third Grand Slam title of the year. But The Post's Thomas Boswell says the day's sour mood was a perfect example of what's wrong with tennis.

Patrick Rafter Wins
AFP Photo
Rafter Defeats Rusedski
To Complete Unlikely Run

Patrick Rafter (pictured) became Australia's first U.S. Open men's champion since 1973 on Sunday, defeating hard-serving Greg Rusedski, 6-3, 6-2, 4-6, 7-5, for his first Grand Slam title. The victory will jump the 12th-seeded Rafter from No. 14 to No. 3 in the world rankings. To earn the title, Rafter had to fend off some bullet serves from England's Rusedski, including one clocked at a record 143 miles per hour.

KEY U.S OPEN INFO
Current Scores | Today's Results | Draws | Daily Schedule
Men's Bios | Women's Bios | Virtual Tour of Ashe Stadium | Net Cameras


Michael Chang
AP Photo
SATURDAY'S ACTION
Chang Misses Out Again
When Michael Chang (pictured) won the French Open at 17, its appeared that the California native was headed for many more Grand Slam titles. But it hasn't happened. Chang was overwhelmed by Australian Patrick Rafter, 6-3, 6-3, 6-4, Saturday in the U.S. Open semifinals in Arthur Ashe Stadium. Rafter will meet Greg Rusedski in Sunday’s final.


FRIDAY'S ACTION
Teen Phenoms to Meet in Women's Final
Martina Hingis, 16, and the top player in women's tennis represents the present state of tennis, while 17-year-old Venus Williams represents the future. Hingis defeated Lindsay Davenport, 6-2, 6-4, Friday afternoon, while Williams edged Irina Spirlea, 7-6 (7-5), 4-6, 7-6 (9-7), in the other semifinal to set up what promises to be an interesting final.


THURSDAY'S ACTION
Chang Needs Five Sets to Defeat Rios
Michael Chang
AP Photo
Michael Chang (pictured) needed five sets to defeat No. 10 Marcelo Rios on Thursday and will meet No. 13 Patrick Rafter, a straight-sets winner over Magnus Larsson, in the semifinals Saturday. Chang, the No. 2 seed, won the first two sets but had to rebound to win his second consecutive five-set match, while Rafter advanced to his second Grand Slam semifinal this year. "It's going to be a tough match," Chang said. ""Rafter has been playing some great, great tennis." Greg Rusedski meets Jonas Bjorkman in the other semi.


WEDNESDAY'S ACTION
Davenport Rides Swirling Winds at Open
After winning the gold medal at the Olympics last year, Lindsay Davenport put a lot of pressure on herself to do well in a Grand Slam event. On Wednesday, Davenport survived a crazy, windy day at Arthur Ashe Stadium to defeat No. 3 Jana Novotna, 6-4, 4-6, 7-6 (7-5), to reach a Grand Slam semifinal for the first time.

In Foreign Exchange, U.S. Faces Net Loss
Michael Wilbon The perception that tennis is dead is prevalent among many of the dour faces roaming the grounds of the U.S. Open, writes The Post's Michael Wilbon. Yet, a closer look shows that the only people complaining are bored Americans — the game is alive and well in Europe, South America and elsewhere.



TUESDAY'S ACTION
Seles, Agassi Fall; Chang Holds On
One day after top-seeded Pete Sampras was stunned by Petr Korda, two more big names were sent packing at the U.S. Open. Women's No. 2 seed Monica Seles fell to No. 11 Irina Spirlea, 6-7 (7-5), 7-6 (10-8), 6-3, while unseeded Andre Agassi's run ended in a four-set loss to Patrick Rafter. Michael Chang struggled, but rallied to beat France's Cedric Pioline in five sets.

WILBON: Williams Is Young, Gifted and Black


MONDAY'S ACTION
Korda Stuns Sampras in Five-Set Thriller
Sampras and Korda
AP Photo
In a match that took almost five hours, top-seeded Pete Sampras (pictured, right) made too many mistakes Monday and fell to No. 15 seed Petr Korda in five sets. Sampras was bidding for his 11th Grand Slam title.


PERSPECTIVE
Stadium's Fine, but Honor Ashe by Renovating Tennis
Jennifer Frey While Arthur Ashe would have been happy with the renovated National Tennis Center complex — and the unveiling of the new feature court, named Arthur Ashe Stadium — he would have been even happier with kids of divergent cultures and economic backgrounds playing with John McEnroe and Amanda Coetzer on Saturday.


Steffi Graf Wins U.S. Open
File Photo
FLASHBACK: 1996 U.S. OPEN
Graf Wins 5th U.S. Open
Steffi Graf (pictured) was more nervous than usual before the women's singles final at the 1996 U.S. Open. That's because her opponent was Monica Seles, who Graf considers her greatest personal challenger. But Seles was unable to stop Graf, who won, 7-5, 6-4, for her fifth Open title. The Post's Michael Wilbon said the victory was a welcome relief after Graf's difficult year.

Sampras Ends Long Journey, Wins Open
HISTORY
  • Men's Champions
  • Women's Champions
  • History of the Open
  • Pete Sampras defeated Michael Chang, 6-1, 6-4, 7-6, to win the 1996 U.S. Open. It was Sampras's eighth Grand Slam title, but this one was memorable, as he overcame heartbreak and exhaustion, dehydration and nausea.



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