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    monks chanting
Left to right, monks Tashi Sonam, Dhonden Gyatso and Tsultrim Gyatso are building the mandala. Tsering Wangchuk is at far right. (Craig Cola / washingtonpost.com)
Recently at the Sackler Gallery, a group of Tibetan Buddhist monks created a circular devotional painting known as a mandala. This one, made of sand and associated with healing, was destroyed a week after its inception when monks scattered its sand into the Tidal Basin.

Style Live followed the mandala's progress – you can see images of the mandala's construction. We've also created a Flash movie of the mandala's destruction. The Flash browser plug-in is a free download.

One of the monks, Tsering Wangchuk, explains the significance of various parts of the mandala and talks about its progress – his comments appear below the images. If you want to hear his words, click on any of his quotes to hear a version in Real Audio, which you can download for free. You'll also hear some of the chanting from the opening ceremony.

For more information about the mandala, read "The World in a Grain of Sand" by Nicholas Day. The mandala construction is being presented in conjunction with a stunning exhibtion of Tibetan medical text illustrations, The Buddha's Art of Healing, which is on display at the Sackler. (Read Hank Burchard's review of the exhibition.)

For more about the Sackler Gallery, see our profile or visit the Sackler's Web site. Please see the credit information for the online gallery. And to view the mandala gallery, click the arrow below.
   



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