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  •   Charity Sites
    By Hope Katz Gibbs
    March 26, 1999

     
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    Last Year's Guide

    There are hundreds of thousands of charity organizations in the country, and almost every one of them has a Web site. Unfortunately, the majority of these – like the Web homes of many corporations – are byte-size commercials without much useful information. (You can generally forget about making donations online too.) These four sites, however, show how, if you're curious about some good work that's being done, a non-profit's Web page can be a fine place to start.

    GETTING KIDS TO CARE
    http://kidscare.org
    This nonprofit has 270 branches in 38 states geared toward empowering little ones and encouraging them to give back to their communities. The site offers ideas on how to start a local chapter and details on organizing fun fund-raising projects.

    KABOOM!
    http://www.kaboom.org
    Local kids and their parents can volunteer to dig in the dirt to help this D.C.-based nonprofit build playgrounds in poor neighborhoods. It's simple to navigate around this well-organized site, which offers plenty of details about the organization and information on how to volunteer.

    NATIONAL COMPUTER EDUCATION FOUNDATION
    http://www.ncef.net
    Have an old computer and don't know what to do with it? Stop by the site of the National Computer Education Foundation, a Stuart, Fla.-based group; a donation-form page lets you arrange your tax-deductible contribution. (Prefer to deal with a local used-computer operation? Stop by http://www.lazarus.org, the home of Columbia-based Lazarus Foundation.)

    SINGLE VOLUNTEERS OF D.C.
    http://singlevolunteers.org/dc
    Be altruistic while searching for Mr. or Ms. Right at this bar-free nirvana, the D.C. chapter of national nonprofit Single Volunteers – a group of 3,600 do-gooders who answer phones during telethons, help build houses and staff blood drives. The only requirements include being 21, single, and willing to volunteer.

    © Copyright 1999 The Washington Post Company

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