President Trump invited families of Americans killed by those in the country illegally to tell their stories of being “permanently separated” from their loved ones, an implicit comparison to the temporary family separations carried out under his hard-line policy.
Volunteers prepare dinner at the San Juan Bosco migrant shelter in Nogales, Mexico. (Stuart W. Palley for The Post)
Volunteers prepare dinner at the San Juan Bosco migrant shelter in Nogales, Mexico. (Stuart W. Palley for The Post)
Families from Mexico and Central America wait to buy bus tickets in McAllen, Tex. (Jahi Chikwendiu/The Post)
Families from Mexico and Central America wait to buy bus tickets in McAllen, Tex. (Jahi Chikwendiu/The Post)
A crying Honduran woman and her child wait along the border bridge after being denied entry into Brownsville, Tex., on Friday. (Getty Images)
A crying Honduran woman and her child wait along the border bridge after being denied entry into Brownsville, Tex., on Friday. (Getty Images)
Members of two families wait at the Nogales Port of Entry on the Mexican side of the U.S. border. (Stuart Palley for The Post)
Members of two families wait at the Nogales Port of Entry on the Mexican side of the U.S. border. (Stuart Palley for The Post)
President Trump’s will and migrants driven by desperate circumstances are powerful forces colliding in shelters, crossings, courts, detention centers and the desert along the U.S. southern border. The struggle is playing out with all the predictability, clarity and order of an earthquake.
As the Mexican presidential election nears, the social media giant is trying to battle abuses and fake news. But the trickiest area for the company has been domestic disinformation sources that are harder to stop than foreign operators because of free speech issues.
Auto tariffs are shaping up to be the next battle in what European officials fear is developing into a full-blown trade war between the U.S. and its closest allies. 
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A member of the Human Rights Council said he was told his findings would factor into whether the the United States would remain in the council. Nikki Haley announced withdrawal plans this week.
It is a felony to knowingly file a false tax return. The charity blamed the mistakes on clerical errors and a lack of knowledge about tax rules.
President Trump called Rep. Mark Sanford (R-S.C.) a “nasty guy,” eliciting boos and nervous laughter. Zero lawmakers of two dozen questioned by The Post backed up Trump’s claim that they “applauded and laughed loudly” as he dissed Sanford, but few called him out for his false portrayal.
Monsignor Carlo Capella’s trial marks a major test of how the Vatican’s justice system will address one aspect of the abuse that has deeply scarred the Catholic Church.
World Cup 2018
Analysis
Comparisons with LeBron James’s Cavaliers almost drew themselves after the soccer powerhouse found itself close to elimination.
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Dick Leitsch
1935–2018
“His actions,” one historian said, “helped make it easier for a generation of gay people to come out and be openly gay.”
For 16 years, speculation about the man’s identity has stumped law enforcement.
The unanswered questions after Trump's immigration executive order
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