Many parents prefer mixing online and in-person school, poll finds

Most parents see in-person school as unsafe, a Post-Schar School poll found — but parents also express serious concerns with online schooling. Many are drawn to systems that combine the two.
Aimee Rodriguez Webb, a teacher for the Cobb County School District in Georgia, works in the virtual classroom she has set up at her dining room table. (AP)
Aimee Rodriguez Webb, a teacher for the Cobb County School District in Georgia, works in the virtual classroom she has set up at her dining room table. (AP)

America is about to start online learning, Round 2. For millions of students, it won’t be any better.

School officials nationwide, caught up in the reopening debate, had little time to prepare for online learning.
Stories You’ll Want to Hear

‘Torture memos’ author emboldens Trump to threaten use of executive power for coronavirus relief

Plus, Facebook and Twitter penalize President Trump for posting coronavirus misinformation. And Senate Republicans criticize Trump’s plan to deliver his convention speech from the White House.
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The port in Beirut in June and on Tuesday. (Maxar Technologies/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock)

After the blast: Satellite images show destruction in Beirut

Shock turns to anger as Beirut assesses damage inflicted by massive explosion

Lebanese are asking why officials allowed tons of explosive chemicals to be stored at the city’s port for years.
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Facebook, Twitter penalize Trump for virus misinformation

A video clip from a Fox News interview — in which the president said that children are “almost immune” to covid-19 — was the offending material.
President Trump speaks during a briefing on Wednesday. (Jabin Botsford/The Post)
President Trump speaks during a briefing on Wednesday. (Jabin Botsford/The Post)

Legal scholars dispute Trump’s claim to power ‘nobody thought the president had’

President Trump has asserted that with the stroke of a pen he can break through gridlock on immigration and health care and the stalemate on a coronavirus relief package.
Volunteers gather aid supplies on Wednesday to be distributed for those affected by Tuesday's blast in Beirut's port area. (Reuters)
Volunteers gather aid supplies on Wednesday to be distributed for those affected by Tuesday's blast in Beirut's port area. (Reuters)

After Beirut blasts, international aid and rescue workers pour into city

Losses from the explosion may total up to $5 billion, Beirut governor Marwan Abboud said, a sum that Lebanon, already in the throes of financial disaster, is ill-equipped to absorb.

‘I have no idea how I’m not dead’: A Post correspondent recalls doomful night in Beirut

When blasts tore through Beirut on Tuesday, a Post correspondent scrambled to find her friends and reach safety.

On anniversary of bombing, Hiroshima mayor issues a warning

The mayor warned about the rise of “self-centered nationalism” and appealed for greater international cooperation to overcome the coronavirus pandemic.
(Getty Images)
(Getty Images)

Supreme Court sees approval rating rise after consequential term

Roughly equal majorities of Republicans, Democrats and independents approve of the high court.

Gen. David Goldfein, bypassed to be Trump’s top military adviser, retires

The top Air Force officer’s legacy includes overseeing the service during the air war against the Islamic State, creating a new Space Force and speaking out on the issue of racial inequality.
Pete Hamill
1935–2020

Journalist, novelist and tabloid poet of New York dies at 85

Hamill captured life in the city with his gritty but lyrical columns for the Daily News, Post and other New York papers.

GOP senators join call to extend airline bailout program

Sixteen Senate Republicans said they support extending a program designed to prevent layoffs in the airline industry during the pandemic.
Perspective

Investing lessons from the Apple stock split

The Dow has big point swings and is fun to watch. But the S&P, which rewards market value rather than stock price, is a more rational place to put your money.
Gold prices have been surging since late 2018 and have climbed nearly 35 percent in 2020. (Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg News)
Gold prices have been surging since late 2018 and have climbed nearly 35 percent in 2020. (Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg News)

5 reasons gold prices are soaring

The precious metal – which passed the $2,000 mark for the first time this week – has surged 72 percent since the rally began in fall 2018.
At least the injury suffered Wednesday by Max Scherzer was baseball-related. (Shawn Thew/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock)
At least the injury suffered Wednesday by Max Scherzer was baseball-related. (Shawn Thew/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock)
Perspective

In baseball’s pandemic season, Max Scherzer’s injury counts as a welcome diversion

No one wants to see the Nationals — or anyone — get hurt. But during this most unusual season, thinking about a malady that's baseball-related feels refreshingly normal.

Md. trooper wrote DWI tickets to fictitious drivers, pleads guilty to perjury

Trooper John Sollon filed entire false cases against defendants who didn't exist, and in some cases, officers tried in vain to track them down. Sollon is still employed by the state police with pay.

Almost 4 in 10 election-judge jobs in Maryland are vacant. Officials are begging Hogan to change his Election Day plan.

More than 1,000 poll workers in the state have dropped out over the past week, boosting pressure on Gov. Larry Hogan to abandon his plans to open every voting precinct on Nov. 3.
Healthcare workers wait for patients to be tested at a walk-in covid-19 testing site earlier this summer in Arlington. (AFP/Getty Images)
Healthcare workers wait for patients to be tested at a walk-in covid-19 testing site earlier this summer in Arlington. (AFP/Getty Images)

Montgomery County doubles down on directive to close private schools, defying Hogan’s order

In Virginia, officials announced a smartphone app to provide notifications of possible coronavirus exposure.
The weedy edge of Glover-Archbold Park in NW Washington. (Adrian Higgins/The Post)
The weedy edge of Glover-Archbold Park in NW Washington. (Adrian Higgins/The Post)

Weeds seize any opportunity to spread — and this summer, they’re ferocious

Unless the cycle of spread is halted early, small numbers turn into huge numbers. But many people are blind to these invaders.
(Geoff Kim for The Post)
(Geoff Kim for The Post)

The revealing and disturbing story of America, told through 20 years of reality dating shows

What has watching shows like “Who Wants to Marry a Multi-Millionaire?,” “The Bachelor” and “Flavor of Love” done to our culture?
(Tom McCorkle for The Post)
(Tom McCorkle for The Post)

Kaiserschmarrn is the most beautiful, delicious mess of a pancake you’ll ever make, and eat

You'll flip for this European specialty topped with lots of confectioners' sugar and roasted plums.
(iStock/The Washington Post)
(iStock/The Washington Post)

The new rules for packing a bag during the pandemic

Checked bag vs. carry-on? Health experts weigh in on the best practices for air travel right now.

Union wants vulnerable TSA officers kept home as coronavirus cases surge

The number of TSA employees testing positive is climbing rapidly, topping 1,500, according to figures released Tuesday.
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