Wide swaths of the country are ill-prepared for a surge of virus patients

The pandemic has revealed a dearth of reliable data about the key parts of the nation’s health-care system, leaving decision-makers operating in the dark. The Post assembled data to analyze the availability of the critical-care resources needed to treat patients who require extended hospitalization.
Coal cars wait in line to be loaded at a coal loading facility in Belle, W.Va. (Michael S. Williamson/The Post)
Coal cars wait in line to be loaded at a coal loading facility in Belle, W.Va. (Michael S. Williamson/The Post)
Harold Sturgill at his home in Coal City, W.Va. (Michael S. Williamson/The Post)
Harold Sturgill at his home in Coal City, W.Va. (Michael S. Williamson/The Post)
A church that clearly had a dwindling number of members sits abandoned near Eunice, W.Va. (Michael S. Williamson/The Post)
A church that clearly had a dwindling number of members sits abandoned near Eunice, W.Va. (Michael S. Williamson/The Post)
David Bounds of Oak Hill, W.Va., struggles with black lung disease and feels even more vulnerable to the coronavirus. (Michael S. Williamson/The Post)
David Bounds of Oak Hill, W.Va., struggles with black lung disease and feels even more vulnerable to the coronavirus. (Michael S. Williamson/The Post)
A coal mining operation in Belle, W.Va. (Michael S. Williamson/The Post)
A coal mining operation in Belle, W.Va. (Michael S. Williamson/The Post)

As the coronavirus hits, coal companies aim to cut the tax they pay to support black-lung miners

The nation’s coal companies, citing the economic impact of the pandemic, want to roll back their payments to the Black Lung Disability Trust Fund. That would leave the federal government to pick up the tab for 25,000 ailing miners.

Unemployment claims soar, signaling worst jobless rate since Great Depression

Last week’s 6.6 million applications for unemployment benefits are on top of the nearly 10 million Americans who had already applied for unemployment the two previous weeks.

Trump and top aides repeatedly use briefings to describe efforts that have not panned out

The Trump administration’s pronouncements and pledges have turned out, again and again, to be out of sync with what doctors, nurses and stricken families are reporting.
Analysis

The lesson of revised death toll estimates shouldn’t be that distancing was an overreaction

There has been an increasing focus on the question of whether we went too far. But the revised estimate was a result of new information about distancing efforts.

Guide to the pandemic

There have been more than 1.4 million confirmed cases of covid-19. The virus has killed more than 83,000. Access to the following stories is free:
Stories You’ll Want to Hear

After the pandemic, how will the economy bounce back?

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Emergency public health measures have led to a 56 percent drop in unlawful border crossings from Mexico, and U.S. Customs and Border Protection now has fewer than 100 people in custody.
Linda Tripp on Dec. 14, 1998, in Washington. (AP)
Linda Tripp on Dec. 14, 1998, in Washington. (AP)
America cast former White House secretary Linda Tripp as the villain in the Clinton-Lewinsky scandal. History will remember her, just not in the way she ever hoped or imagined.
Climate Solutions
A warming climate means more frequent flooding that can send raw sewage into rivers and streams.
On Fox News, the attorney general was asked about civil liberties concerns surrounding the government’s steps to stem the spread of coronavirus.
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A Post Travel Destination
The most loathed position in the cabin is not even an option on some flights.
Trending

Hundreds of young Americans have now been killed by the coronavirus, data shows

While the novel coronavirus might be most threatening to the old and compromised, no one is immune.
Perspective

John Prine’s lyrical one-liners could take your breath away

The songwriting legend, who died Tuesday of covid-19 complications, knew how to land a punchline.
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By The Way

Travel photographers are taking epic nature photos using indoor optical illusions

Outdoor enthusiasts stuck at home because of the pandemic are getting creative with #OurGreatIndoors.
(Whitney Leaming, Whitney Shefte/The Washington Post)
Inside a Chicago hospital built to deal with a pandemic
Inside a Chicago hospital built to deal with a pandemic
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Why black communities are more at risk of contracting coronavirus
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