Trump’s push to amplify racism unnerves Republicans

President Trump has left little doubt through his utterances the past few weeks that he sees himself not only as the Republican standard-bearer but as a leader of a modern grievance movement animated by civic strife and marked by calls for “white power.”
The Debrief

For Trump, the threat now isn’t immigrants or other nations. It’s other Americans.

He made clear that his reelection message will do little to try to heal or unify the country but rather aims to drive a deeper wedge into the nation’s racial and cultural divides.

America’s 244th birthday: Dark skies, but also new hope

Frightened and isolated by the novel coronavirus, many Americans see protests over racial inequality as a step toward national renewal.
Fireworks light up the sky above the Washington Monument on Saturday. (Craig Hudson for The Post)
Fireworks light up the sky above the Washington Monument on Saturday. (Craig Hudson for The Post)
Visitors watch fireworks from the South Lawn at the White House on Saturday. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post)
Visitors watch fireworks from the South Lawn at the White House on Saturday. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post)
Black Lives Matter protesters face D.C. police while attempting to build a blockade on H Street near the White House on July 4. (Astrid Riecken for The Post)
Black Lives Matter protesters face D.C. police while attempting to build a blockade on H Street near the White House on July 4. (Astrid Riecken for The Post)
The Adey family hold aloft a Trump 2020 campaign banner before a military flyover in Washington, D.C., on Saturday. (Craig Hudson for The Post)
The Adey family hold aloft a Trump 2020 campaign banner before a military flyover in Washington, D.C., on Saturday. (Craig Hudson for The Post)
Protesters march near the Washington Monument on Saturday. (Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post)
Protesters march near the Washington Monument on Saturday. (Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post)
President Trump and the first lady watch military aircraft fly over the White House Saturday. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post)
President Trump and the first lady watch military aircraft fly over the White House Saturday. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post)

In era of racial unrest, Americans converging in D.C. to celebrate Fourth of July question the meaning of freedom

The crowds that typically flow into the District on Independence Day were markedly thinner this year — and often headed in different directions. Hundreds flocked to Black Lives Matter Plaza, while hundreds more ventured to the Mall for protests or to celebrate the nation’s founding.

U.S. logs 26th straight day of record average case totals

Officials and health experts watched nervously to see whether July 4 gatherings would increase the spread while the virus continued to spiral out of control, particularly in the South.
To contain the spread of coronavirus, contract tracing is key. But doing it effectively will take an army of people. (Video: Lee Powell; photo: Jahi Chikwendiu/The Post)

Contact tracing is a race. But few U.S. states say how fast they’re running.

Coronavirus case spikes will hamper contact-tracing efforts, but even states seeing declines are finding it hard to measure their success.
(Adriana Usero, Allie Caren/The Washington Post)
The art of declaring independence | Critics At Home
The art of declaring independence | Critics At Home
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A health commissioner's fight to help his county and his own family
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The government again demonstrates how (not) to use fireworks
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The Game Theorists' guide to co-op gaming
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Stories You’ll Want to Hear

‘The Cursed Platoon,’ Part 2

1st Lt. Clint Lorance had been in charge of his Army platoon for three days when he ordered them to kill three Afghans on a dirt road. After a second-degree murder conviction, Lorance was pardoned by President Trump, hailed as a hero. His troops suffered a different fate.
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Historians question Trump’s choice of ‘heroes’ for national garden monument

Among the statues to be erected in the garden — spelled out in an executive order — are evangelical leader Billy Graham, frontiersman Davy Crockett, first lady Dolley Madison and Supreme Court justice Antonin Scalia.

We asked veterans to respond to The Post’s reporting on Clint Lorance and his platoon. Here’s what they said.

Many said they were moved to tears reading about the experiences of 1st Platoon. Others questioned how the soldiers could blindly follow orders to shoot at civilians.
Armed militia members, bikers and white nationalists turned up at the grounds of the Gettysburg National Military Park in Pennsylvania on July 4 to defend against a supposed burning of the U.S. flag. (Andrew Mangum for The Post)
Armed militia members, bikers and white nationalists turned up at the grounds of the Gettysburg National Military Park in Pennsylvania on July 4 to defend against a supposed burning of the U.S. flag. (Andrew Mangum for The Post)

Militias flocked to Gettysburg to foil a supposed antifa flag burning, an apparent hoax created on social media

On Saturday afternoon, in the hours before the flag burning was to start, they flooded in by the hundreds — unaware, it seemed, that the mysterious Internet poster was not who the person claimed to be.
Don’t Miss

Trump silent on Putin amid uproar over alleged Russian bounties

The possibility that Russia paid militants to target U.S. forces — and that the president received reports about the activity but did little about it — has revived allegations, particularly among Democrats, that President Trump is loath to confront Russia.

Joint effort by two Democratic super PACs raised $107 million so far in election cycle, groups say

American Bridge and Unite the Country are pooling resources to attack President Trump in key states and project positive messages around former vice president Joe Biden.
Passengers walk through Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport ahead of the Fourth of July holiday travel weekend. (Erik S Lesser/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock)
Passengers walk through Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport ahead of the Fourth of July holiday travel weekend. (Erik S Lesser/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock)
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Analysis

Hard-hit industries clamor for regulations during pandemic

Business interests see a short-term battle against two hard-to-influence forces: individuals acting irresponsibly and a Trump administration reluctant to lay down guidelines that would mandate individual behavior during the pandemic.
A statue of Henri Francois Xavier de Belsunce de Castelmoron, a bishop of Marseille known for his fight against the 1720 plague. (Emilienne Malfatto for The Post)
A statue of Henri Francois Xavier de Belsunce de Castelmoron, a bishop of Marseille known for his fight against the 1720 plague. (Emilienne Malfatto for The Post)
Visual Story

The site of Europe’s last plague escapes the worst of this pandemic

As France emerges from its coronavirus lockdown and life returns to almost-normal, the historic port city of Marseille considers itself lucky.

Before the coronavirus, CDC made similar errors with Zika tests

The CDC sidelined an effective Zika test in favor of a more complex one that failed about one-third of the time.
A mask-to-mask transaction takes place at Joplin Ave. Coffee Company. (Terra Fondriest for The Post)
A mask-to-mask transaction takes place at Joplin Ave. Coffee Company. (Terra Fondriest for The Post)

A small Missouri city thought it had dodged the coronavirus. Now, it’s hitting home.

It seemed this spring that the pandemic sweeping America had passed Joplin by. Now that it has arrived following a rapid statewide reopening, however, it’s hitting the region with a vengeance.
(Adam Glanzman for The Washington Post)
(Adam Glanzman for The Washington Post)
Washington Redskins owner Daniel Snyder, left, and partial owners Dwight Schar, center, and Robert Rothman. (John McDonnell /The Post)
Washington Redskins owner Daniel Snyder, left, and partial owners Dwight Schar, center, and Robert Rothman. (John McDonnell /The Post)

As Redskins consider name change, Snyder’s inner circle is smaller than ever

With Daniel Snyder facing the greatest crisis of his 21-year ownership of the Washington Redskins, the recent lack of leadership on the team’s business side has been an issue.
A car drives onto the Historic White’s Ferry on the Montgomery County side of the Potomac River at dusk on June 28. (Michael S. Williamson/The Post)
A car drives onto the Historic White’s Ferry on the Montgomery County side of the Potomac River at dusk on June 28. (Michael S. Williamson/The Post)

A Confederate statue is toppled in rural Maryland, then quietly stored away

Amid protests of racism and inequity, a family removes Confederate symbols from its ferry business and wants nothing more to do with the attention they brought.

People are driving less and skipping toll roads, leaving less money for local projects

The industry’s losses, which by estimates will exceed $9 billion nationwide, are prompting toll operators to tap their reserves, delay capital projects and cut jobs.

University of Maryland Medical System signs new deal with company under firm headed by former board member

The optics of former state Sen. Francis “Frank” Kelly Jr. being awarded a contract that he “monopolized for years as a board member” were not good, said state Sen. Jill P. Carter.
  • 7 hours ago
“Moon over Harlem” (ca. 1943-1944) by William H. Johnson. (Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of the Harmon Foundation)
“Moon over Harlem” (ca. 1943-1944) by William H. Johnson. (Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of the Harmon Foundation)
Great Works, In Focus
Perspective

The man and the moon

After race riots in Harlem, William Johnson painted the pain.
(Tom McCorkle for The Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Post)
(Tom McCorkle for The Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Post)

Chill out this summer with pina coladas, frozen Irish coffees and other blended cocktails

Dust off your blender, because it's about to get a workout.
Grand Prize winner: Redwood National and State Parks in California. (Sam Jezak)
Grand Prize winner: Redwood National and State Parks in California. (Sam Jezak)

If you can’t get to a national park, appreciate their beauty with these 11 photos

The National Park Foundation launched a special edition for its 2020 photo contest. Here are last year’s winners.
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