The GOP adjusted the child tax credit to add more benefits for working families as the party finalized its tax bill, a change that prompted Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) to suggest he had dropped his threat of a “no” vote. With his support, Republicans are close to locking down the 50 Senate votes they need to pass the measure.
The Fix
Analysis
The president is often asked hypothetical questions about very serious matters that other politicians would steer clear of and offers a “we'll see what happens” in response. But what usually happens next?
Kushner’s lawyer, Abbe Lowell, has quietly called at least two firms, according to four people familiar with the matter. Crisis PR firms are often retained to handle a negative development or an avalanche of media inquiries. Kushner has been in the headlines almost daily, and he has complained to friends about the nonstop negative attention from the news media.
(The Washington Post)
Journalists weigh in on what movies reveal about their profession, from “His Girl Friday” to “Spotlight.”
  • 1 day ago
‘His Girl Friday’
“The 1940 movie will make any grizzled reporter wistful for the days when press rooms were crowded with reporters from competing local papers, pre-TV and pre-Internet disruption.”
— Jill Abramson, former executive editor of the New York Times
‘Citizen Kane’
“It’s easily overlooked that ‘Citizen Kane’ is not just a movie about a journalist. It’s also a work of journalism itself.”
— Chris Matthews, anchor of MSNBC’s “Hardball”
‘Network’
“This is a 41-year-old movie that bites like a contemporary satire.”
— Katy Tur, correspondent for NBC News
‘All the President’s Men’
“This was one time the Academy Awards got it right, when [Jason] Robards, as Ben Bradlee, won the Oscar.”
— Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, authors of the original book “All the President’s Men”
‘The Killing Fields’
“The aspect of Roland Joffe’s film that most stays with me is that international politics should not be thought of as an abstraction ... It has immediate, tangible and sometimes terrible consequences.”
— Fareed Zakaria, host of CNN’s “Fareed Zakaria GPS”
‘Broadcast News’
“It’s an unvarnished look at the vanity, insanity and profanity that permeates the news business.”
— Katie Couric, journalist and best-selling author
‘Shattered Glass’
“Writer-director Billy Ray got the big picture right, too, making a story of journalistic practice an exploration of human nature.”
— Charles Lane, Post editorial writer and former New Republic editor
‘Good Night, and Good Luck’
“The film is exquisitely current at a time when the news media are being attacked as ‘the enemy of the people.’”
— Andrea Mitchell, NBC News chief foreign affairs correspondent
‘Frost/Nixon’
“Watching Frost in the first two interviews, I kept screaming at the screen: Jump in! Don’t let him get away with that!”
— Diane Rehm, longtime radio host
‘Spotlight’
“[Director Tom] McCarthy and co-writer Josh Singer wanted to reflect how journalism really works, and their success ranks as one of the movie’s greatest strengths.”
— Martin Baron, executive editor of The Washington Post
The Fix
Analysis
Matthew Spencer Petersen serves on the Federal Election Commission, but he had difficulty answering legal questions posed by Sen. John Neely Kennedy (R-La.).
Far from settling the matter, the Republican-led FCC just opened a new chapter in a bruising Washington fight that stretches back nearly as far as the dot-com boom itself.
A measure passed at the behest of drug companies has hurt efforts to stop suspicious shipments of prescription pain pills and slowed other work by the Drug Enforcement Administration, recently retired investigators told The Washington Post and “60 Minutes.”
The cast and crew pointed to similarities between the movie’s Nixon-era drama and the Trump administration — and they explained how they tried to get the historical details just right.
Chat Transcript
The advice columnist takes your questions about the strange train we call life.
The 19-year-old defendant returned three rings worth at least $5,000, and Fairfax County jurors took up a collection to pay her $60 fine. Numerous criminal lawyers said they had never seen jurors acting similarly. The victim said she thought the fine was too lenient.
Omarosa Manigault Newman seemed cast in the same role in the White House as she had been on “The Apprentice,” on which she was the show’s elegant and icy villain competing for Donald Trump’s favor.
(Photos and animations by Bill O’Leary/Post)
The Washington Post and Consumer Reports partnered to bring you the only guide you’ll need. Post editors selected the best items in categories such as food, technology, books, toys and more, and Consumer Reports experts tested thousands of items to select the finest for this roundup.
  • Nov 6
Video
Social media users are ‘thanking’ black women after Alabama election. Black women are pushing back.
Play Video 1:49
The Fact Checker's list of the biggest Pinocchios of 2017
Play Video 3:55
Apollo 17 left the Moon 45 years ago. That dirty space gear has a story to tell.
Play Video 2:06
The DACA recipients interning in Congress: ‘Just being here is a statement'
Play Video 3:20
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