PROTESTS OF POLICE VIOLENCE
Protesters march Saturday in D.C. to protest police brutality and the death of George Floyd. (Astrid Riecken for The Washington Post)
Protesters march Saturday in D.C. to protest police brutality and the death of George Floyd. (Astrid Riecken for The Washington Post)
Demonstrators gather in front of the Lincoln Memorial. (Matt McClain/The Washington Post)
Demonstrators gather in front of the Lincoln Memorial. (Matt McClain/The Washington Post)
Demonstrators march in downtown D.C. Saturday. (Evelyn Hockstein for The Washington Post)
Demonstrators march in downtown D.C. Saturday. (Evelyn Hockstein for The Washington Post)
Protesters march on Pennsylvania Avenue toward the White House. (John McDonnell/The Washington Post)
Protesters march on Pennsylvania Avenue toward the White House. (John McDonnell/The Washington Post)
Demonstrators march along 23rd Street N,W. following the We Want Change rally at the Lincoln Memorial. (Matt McClain/The Post)
Demonstrators march along 23rd Street N,W. following the "We Want Change" rally at the Lincoln Memorial. (Matt McClain/The Post)
Thousands gather on 16th Street in front of the White House on Saturday. (Jonathan Newton/The Post)
Thousands gather on 16th Street in front of the White House on Saturday. (Jonathan Newton/The Post)

In massive day of rallies, protesters pack the nation’s capital, vowing to be heard

Bearing flags and angry hand-lettered signs, legions of demonstrators gathered at the Lincoln Memorial, thronged outside the White House and marched across the District in one of the biggest local protests so far over police brutality and racial oppression in the United States.
Plexiglass separates a cashier and customer May 29 in Grand Prairie, Texas. (AP)
Plexiglass separates a cashier and customer May 29 in Grand Prairie, Texas. (AP)

‘I don’t know if that counts as a job’: Fewer hours, less pay and more anxiety greet returning workers

As millions of Americans return to the labor force amid the worst economic crisis in a generation, they're unexpectedly discovering their old positions are far more burdensome than they used to be.

Storm preparedness meets coronavirus caution as Cristobal bears down on U.S.

As Tropical Storm Cristobal heads to the U.S. Gulf Coast, emergency management officials are urging people to evacuate when needed, despite the inherent virus risks of bunking in shelters with people who may be covid-positive.

Guide to the pandemic

There have been more than 6.6 million confirmed cases of the coronavirus worldwide. The virus has killed more than 390,000. Access to the following stories is free:
(Ashleigh Joplin/The Washington Post)
How one man turned an iconic dance into a silent protest
At protest site, artists paint it ‘Black Lives Matter’
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Watch the powerful eulogies from George Floyd's memorial in Minneapolis
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Incidents of calling police on black people lead some states to create new laws criminalizing them
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Here’s how to identify law enforcement officers and National Guard units
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Stories You’ll Want to Hear

The legacy of American riots

The double standard that guides who can protest – and how – in America. And, what nursing home residents are experiencing during the pandemic, told firsthand.
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From guns to neck restraint: How police tactics differ in other countries

In Hong Kong, police repeatedly broke their own rules and faced no consequences. But in other nations, including many in Europe, the police practices causing outrage in the United States are banned or are far more strictly regulated.
Retropolis
The Past, Rediscovered

The triumph and tragedy of D-Day, in black and white

A new high-speed Acela train in Washington on Monday. (Katherine Frey/The Post)
A new high-speed Acela train in Washington on Monday. (Katherine Frey/The Post)

In crisis, Amtrak focuses on testing and training for new trains to debut in 2021

Tests of the first two Avelia Liberty high-speed train sets are underway in the Northeast Corridor and at a federal facility in Pueblo, Colo., and railroad crews have started training on the new technology in anticipation of a launch next spring, Amtrak officials said.
Don’t Miss

Mattis joins the list of Trump’s bad breakups with his staffers

Jim Mattis, John Kelly, Jeff Sessions and Rex Tillerson are part of a pattern that raises serious questions about why the president continually hires top officials he later comes to describe as incompetents.

Chemicals used on protesters similar to tear gas, Park Police concede

A spokesman told Vox that it was “a mistake” to deny that the agency employed tear gas on protesters outside the White House. Hours later, the acting chief reiterated his statement that Park Police officers did not use tear gas.
Rep. John Lewis on the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala., in 2015. Lewis was beaten on the bridge on Bloody Sunday in 1965. (Bonnie Jo Mount/The Post)
Rep. John Lewis on the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala., in 2015. Lewis was beaten on the bridge on "Bloody Sunday" in 1965. (Bonnie Jo Mount/The Post)
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Analysis

John Lewis’s ‘good trouble’ of the 1960s resonates for today’s protests for racial justice

The Georgia congressman is absent from Washington as he battles cancer, but lawmakers say his voice remains powerful. “It will never leave us,” said Sen. Doug Jones (D-Ala.).
Demonstrators clash with Hong Kong police in 2019. (Reuters)
Demonstrators clash with Hong Kong police in 2019. (Reuters)

U.S. rivals use protest crackdowns to turn tables on human-rights criticism

China, Iran and others are accusing Washington of having double standards.

France says it killed top al-Qaeda leader in Mali

Abdelmalek Droukdel, who led the extremist organization’s affiliates across North Africa and the Sahel — and is thought to be responsible for hundreds of civilian deaths in recent years — died Wednesday, France’s top defense official said.
(César Rodríguez for The Washington Post)
(César Rodríguez for The Washington Post)

Scientists funded by Zuckerberg urge stricter policies for Facebook

The scientists sent Mark Zuckerberg a letter calling the social media site’s lax policy enforcement around inaccurate information and incendiary language contrary to the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative’s mission.

Census field offices to resume operations after pandemic delay

Employees will receive training and protective gear and won’t knock on doors until August.
Demonstrators march in downtown Middletown, Ohio, on June 3. (Kevin Williams for The Post)
Demonstrators march in downtown Middletown, Ohio, on June 3. (Kevin Williams for The Post)

Ohio small towns see something missing for decades: Protests

George Floyd’s death is resonating far outside of major cities. Residents unused to demonstrating are trying it for the first time — and at first, it feels a little bit awkward.
  • 1 day ago
(Julia Rendleman for The Washington Post)
(Julia Rendleman for The Washington Post)
ESPN has provided extensive coverage of the George Floyd story. (Yana Paskova For The Post)
ESPN has provided extensive coverage of the George Floyd story. (Yana Paskova For The Post)

ESPN has tried to focus more on sports, but that changed with George Floyd

The network's approach in recent years has been to avoid non-sports stories, but they have provided extensive coverage of Floyd's death and ensuing protests.
Olympics

Noah Lyles runs for his country, and he wants to help make it a better place

One of the fastest men on the planet — and a graduate of Alexandria’s T.C. Williams High School — is speaking out about living in America as a black man and representing it as an elite athlete.

D.C. mayor delivers a clear message to Trump

Signaling support for demonstrators and criticism of the president, Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D) formally renamed the street outside the White House after ordering city crews to paint "Black Lives Matter" in giant letters along 16th Street NW.
Kayla Edwards Friedland, center, stands with friends. (Robert Marshall for The Post)
Kayla Edwards Friedland, center, stands with friends. (Robert Marshall for The Post)

‘It was my time to go up to the front’: A night with a student protester in the District

Each night Kayla Edwards Friedland, a rising junior at Georgetown, spends outside the White House, she learns something that makes her more prepared for the next time she goes out to protest police violence.
Perspective

Many black people can’t march against inequality. They’re too busy trying to survive it.

On a recent afternoon, as people waved signs near the White House, a woman in Southeast D.C. handed out 300 meals to her neighbors.
Retropolis
The Past, Rediscovered

After a debate, Fredericksburg, Va., finally removes a slave auction block

The 800-pound auction block was the target of George Floyd protesters before it was removed Friday morning
Clergy members gather at the makeshift memorial to remember George Floyd on June 2 in Minneapolis. (Joshua Lott for The Post)
Clergy members gather at the makeshift memorial to remember George Floyd on June 2 in Minneapolis. (Joshua Lott for The Post)
Perspective

The brutal video of George Floyd’s death can galvanize a nation. If we stop scrolling.

Images launch movements. But in the era of clicks and shares, they risk being data points on a traumatizing timeline.
Jo'Artis Ratti, also known as Big Mijo, krumps in front of a line of police officers on May 31 in Santa Monica. (Pip Cowley)
Jo'Artis Ratti, also known as Big Mijo, krumps in front of a line of police officers on May 31 in Santa Monica. (Pip Cowley)
Perspective

In pain and rage, a protester approached police. And then he danced.

Krump dancer’s in-your-face stomping connects with the LAPD, as streets across the country become performance spaces.
(Tom McCorkle for The Post)
(Tom McCorkle for The Post)

Fresh asparagus stars in a quick-cooking, citrusy stir-fry with salmon

Ginger, garlic and lemon give quick-cooking asparagus and salmon a bright kick.
Passport control at Charles de Gaulle international airport north of Paris on May 14. (Ian Langsdon/EPA Pool/AP)
Passport control at Charles de Gaulle international airport north of Paris on May 14. (Ian Langsdon/EPA Pool/AP)

The coronavirus is reshaping an old hierarchy: Who can travel where

In the short term, holding a particular passport no longer necessarily ensures the level of mobility that it used to.
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