Democracy Dies in Darkness
A review by The Washington Post of nearly 90 state and federal voting lawsuits found that judges have been dubious of Republican arguments about the risk of widespread fraud.
The state’s high court agreed with Democrats on leeway for counting mail-in ballots.
A New York Times report shows that President Trump used tax strategies that are unavailable to most Americans. Households in the middle 20 percent paid an average of about three times what Trump reportedly paid in 2016 and 2017.
Tax records point to potential vulnerabilities for a president whose record has raised concerns about his deference to Russia and other countries.
Analysis
Jimmy Carter voluntarily paid $6,000 in 1976 despite a zero tax bill, while other recent predecessors typically paid tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars.
FAQ
The report on the president’s taxes fills in some gaps in our understanding but doesn’t tell the whole story.
Karen and Marlin Boltz in their home in Cabot, Pa. (Kristian Thacker for The Washington Post)
The choice is especially tough for voters who are socially liberal but fiscally conservative.
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The settlement in the fatal shooting of William Green is one of the nation’s largest involving a death at the hands of an on-duty officer, the family’s lawyers say.
(Video: Alice Li/The Post; photo: Ringo Chiu/Reuters)
The fires have spread during yet another in a series of heat waves that have shattered records across the state since August, and dry offshore winds are pushing the flames to spread rapidly.
listen-solidPodcastPost Reports
What we’ve learned from President Trump’s tax returns. Who is Judge Amy Coney Barrett? And what it’s like to moderate a presidential debate — and why it might be a good thing to lose the audience.
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Parscale, who ran the president's campaign until July, was taken willingly to the hospital by police under a Florida law that allows authorities to detain a person they think poses a danger to themselves.
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What do we now know about Trump’s tax returns?
The Washington Post’s David A. Fahrenthold analyzes the latest revelations about President Trump’s tax returns and what it reveals about his finances.
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The president believes that he alone, unfiltered, can rescue his reelection chances. But it’s not clear that his incendiary words are persuading many voters.
President Trump and Ivanka Trump at the White House in April. (Bloomberg News)
RetropolisThe Past, Rediscovered
Not even Maureen Reagan wielded as much power as Ivanka, though other presidential daughters have left their mark on 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.
President Trump’s nominee would bring a sharp shift in views on birth control from the liberal icon she would succeed.
Alecia Kitts was Tasered by a police officer on Sept. 23 in Logan, Ohio, after she refused to wear a mask while attending a middle school football game. (Tiffany Kennedy via Storyful)
The Atlantic has been forced to dip into the Greek alphabet after exhausting its list of conventional storm names for only the second time on record. 
In early September, Andrew Beattie's family was discussing the holiday and they came up with an idea. 
The Trump administration is trying to prohibit personal communications in the TikTok case, a judge said, which is not allowed under the act the president used.
A few customers brave rainy-day weather to dine at Kachka in Portland, Ore. (Leah Nash for The Post)
Restaurants are scrambling for solutions — yet again — before they face what one chef called an “extinction event.”
Last year, the median and mean wealth for Black families was less than 15 percent that of White families, according to the 2019 Survey of Consumer Finances.
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Recent research suggests that people with “Dark Triad” or antisocial personality traits appear less willing to comply with public health guidelines.
The 94-year-old naturalist said the achievement has given him “important hope” for the future amid growing concerns over “the destruction of nature.”
A Georgia State fan cheered on the Panthers on Sept. 19 against Louisiana. (Getty Images)
Georgia State was scheduled to play at Charlotte on Saturday, but the game was called off after four players tested positive for the novel coronavirus, with quarantine deemed necessary for 17 others. The school later said that there was an incorrect reading of the test results.
The Eastern Conference finals ended exactly how they began: with Adebayo exhibiting perfect timing and playing well beyond his years in the tensest moments. His performance delivered Miami to the finals, fulfilling an extended rebuilding process highlighted by the 2019 acquisition of Jimmy Butler.
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There will be no triple crown winner, but the Preakness Stakes will serve as a “Win and You’re In” for the Nov. 7 Breeders’ Cup Classic at Keeneland.
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 17: Examples of Second Story Cards are seen outside Glen's Garden Market on Thursday September 17, 2020 in Washington, DC. The company enlists area homeless people to come up with greeting cards. (Photo by Matt McClain/The Washington Post)
The fate of Second Story Cards may be less certain because of the pandemic’s squeeze. Founder Reed Sandridge is worried not only about his own well-being and economic prospects, but those of his cardmakers.
She wants to extend her sympathy, but his family tells her not to.
They want to foster children, and worry about the impact brother’s family may have.
Reader can’t introduce himself to strangers and doesn’t know how to start a conversation.