Democracy Dies in Darkness
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The $1.9 trillion package enjoys wide support across the country, polls show, and it is likely to be felt quickly by low- and moderate-income Americans.
Democrats voted to adopt the bill without any Republican support after a more than 24-hour session. It will now fall to the House next week to consider the sweeping package once again before it can become law.
The former Methodist church in Linden, N.C., is now the worship and meeting home for a controversial whites-only group. (Eamon Queeney for The Post)
Locals in Linden, N.C., were startled when the Asatru Folk Assembly arrived, intent on preserving “ethnic European folk.” “It’s appalling,” Bishop Hope Morgan Ward, who leads the United Methodist Church in North Carolina, said recently. “But we have no control over it."
As state GOP lawmakers move to restrict voting, congressional Democrats push to make voting easier and change campaign finance laws.
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Facilities owned by Fortune 500 energy giants NRG, Calpine Corporation and Vistra Corporation, all headquartered in Texas, and the Chicago-based Exelon, experienced shutdowns during last month’s winter storm as well as during the state’s last historic cold snap a decade ago, according to a review by The Washington Post.
So far, U.S. officials say there is no sign that federal agencies or major defense contractors have been hacked, but they fear it could cripple many small and midsize businesses and state and local government agencies.
Black and White protesters picket outside the White House in 1930. (Library of Congress)
On International Unemployment Day, the integrated demonstration outside the White House — and in many U.S. cities — was met with violence.
The Times said David Brooks’s paid relationship with the Aspen Institute was approved by his previous editors, but his current editors were unaware of the arrangement. 
The future of voting rights — in state legislatures across the country and before the Supreme Court.
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Cuomo under fire for sexual harassment allegations, coronavirus data scandal
Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo (D-N.Y.) faces calls to resign amid allegations of sexual harassment and questions about how nursing home coronavirus deaths were reported.
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The letter was sent to the Republican National Committee, the National Republican Congressional Committee and the National Republican Senatorial Committee, the former president’s advisers confirmed.
President Biden’s pick for deputy attorney general faces her Senate confirmation hearing Tuesday.
Sen. Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.) on Friday voted against the inclusion of a $15-an-hour minimum wage hike in the coronavirus relief bill. (Video: The Post; photo: Reuters)
The Democratic senator's vote recalls the late Arizona senator John McCain (R), and it drew ire from the left.
 The Washington Post and the Partnership for Public Service are tracking nominees for roughly 800 of those 1,250 positions, including Cabinet secretaries, chief financial officers, general counsels, ambassadors and other critical leadership positions.
Full coverage of what the president is doing to enact his agenda.
Although Pope Francis is vaccinated against the coronavirus, Iraq has only just begun a limited inoculation program.
(Reuters)
The Saudi crown prince faces possible crimes against humanity charges as the German justice system considers some crimes so grave — such as genocide and war crimes — that impunity and territorial restraints on prosecutions should not apply.
Finnegan Lee Elder, 21, and Gabriel Natale-Hjorth, 20, are accused of killing a police officer in Rome.
Labor rights groups argue that mandatory vaccines would not stop the spread of the coronvirus but could lead to discrimination on socioeconomic and ethnic grounds.
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(Sergio Flores for The Post)
The White House is treating the fast-growing influx mostly as a logistical challenge, taking measures to accommodate it rather than change the upward trend.
“He demanded if I lived there because ‘you look suspicious.’ I showed my keys & buzzed myself into my building. He left, no apology.”
The acting police chief says he needs a larger force to help combat the new threat of domestic terrorism.
Bus advocates are urging officials to restore space while others say buses will operate more efficiently.
Doug, a puppy training to be a service dog, rests during a gathering at Western Correctional Institution in Cumberland, Md., (Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post)
During one alleged attack, a man was mauled in his cell on Christmas Day.
At either Spice Kraft, you’ll dine happily on lunch bowls, curry wraps and luscious lamb.
Mr. Davis, who died of complications from covid-19, wrote a two-hander that became a staple of community theater after premiering on Broadway in 1981.
These works, recommended by local authors and bookstore owners, remind us just how special Washington is.
The linebacker will not be charged after an investigation by local police pertaining to interactions between him and his former girlfriend.
At Yankee Stadium in the Bronx, an effort to vaccinate local residents has gone into extra innings — and the energy is proving contagious.
Unlike prior tournaments, all of March Madness will take place in Indiana this year. (AP)
Only two Big Ten games were played last season before the rest of the event was scuttled by the coronavirus pandemic. The tournament returns this year — but in a decidedly different form. Here’s what you need to know.
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