A month after President Trump declared the Islamic State defeated and ordered that the 2,000 U.S. troops in Syria be withdrawn, the bombing showed that the militants are likely to remain a force in Syria for the foreseeable future.
Deputy Secretary Pam Patenaude disagreed with members of the administration over housing policy and the White House’s attempt to block disaster funding for Puerto Rico, according to people with knowledge of the situation.
“If we don’t work, we don’t get paid.”
— Pablo Lazaro, a cook at the National Museum of the American Indian
“It’s really terrifying.”
— Nicole Bryner, who works at the Smithsonian
“Why am I nonessential?”
— Amy McCarthy, a consumer safety officer at the Food and Drug Administration
“This thing is a national disaster.”
— John Boyd, a farmer
“It will affect my ability to get care.”
— Violet Kuchar, a financial management officer with the Peace Corps
“It’s causing a lot of agitation.”
— Richard Heldreth, who works at a federal correctional complex
“All of us deserve a little bit more respect.”
— Tony Mazzoccoli, director of strategic planning at the State Department
(The Washington Post)
The partial government shutdown is now the longest in American history, and hundreds of thousands of people, from farmers to prison guards, are feeling the strain.
The House speaker’s confrontational approach to the president has united Democrats and cheered liberals — but it also carries risks ahead of the 2020 campaign.
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President Trump plans to roll out the new strategy on Thursday alongside military leaders at the Pentagon.
John Engler often inadvertently offended the victims of disgraced former university sports medicine doctor Larry Nassar.
Jilmar Ramos-Gomez’s story gained national attention after the ACLU demanded an investigation to figure out how he was slated for deportation.
Rachel Lachenauer is deciding whether to take part in the march. (Bonnie Jo Mount/The Post)
Rachel Lachenauer is deciding whether to take part in the march. (Bonnie Jo Mount/The Post)
A memento from the first march in the home of Shari Schwartz. (Bonnie Jo Mount/The Post)
A memento from the first march in the home of Shari Schwartz. (Bonnie Jo Mount/The Post)
Schwartz made this sign for the 2017 march but won’t march this year. (Family photo)
Schwartz made this sign for the 2017 march but won’t march this year. (Family photo)
Rachel Nadelman thinks not participating would be taking the easy route. (Bonnie Jo Mount/The Post)
Rachel Nadelman thinks not participating would be taking the easy route. (Bonnie Jo Mount/The Post)
As the rally prepares to return to the nation’s capital on Saturday, the sense of unity that was evident when it debuted in 2017 has frayed. The controversy stems from a co-president of the march who attended a Nation of Islam event at which incendiary remarks were made about Jews.
Analysis
Democrats have very real divisions about public education today — namely how schools should operate and what kind of schools the public should pay for.
Commentary about Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s intelligence, clothing and working-class roots has been so relentless that even some Republicans are coming to her defense.
Market Watch
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