Democracy Dies in Darkness
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While many Democrats and liberal activists insisted the fight is not over, they face long odds, as key lawmakers have said they are not willing to eliminate the chamber’s supermajority filibuster rule for legislation.
Democrats and voting rights activists have long decried voter ID rules as thinly veiled tactics to suppress the vote. Now some leading voices are signaling they would accept such requirements as the price of broader voting rights measures.
Senior military officials have been resistant to the idea because oversight of disciplinary matters within the ranks is a long-standing military tradition that few are willing to surrender.
Final results are not expected until July 12, given that the new ballots allowed voters to rank as many as five candidates.
Khurshida Banu, 49, contracted covid-19 and suffered severe lung damage in February. Two weeks after she returned from the hospital, one of her eyes wouldn’t open. (Ronny Sen for The Post)
After surviving the coronavirus, their worlds have been plunged into darkness by mucormycosis, a deadly post-covid fungus that often can be treated only by removing it from the infected area — and that area is often the eye.
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Houston Methodist — one of the first health systems to require the coronavirus shots — parted ways with 153 workers Tuesday, spokeswoman Gale Smith said. Smith declined to specify how many were in each category.
The new information, included in interviews with agency officials and 83 pages of internal documents, might not quiet a furor over the drug Aduhelm.
Carl Nassib made NFL history Monday when he came out as gay. (Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
Carl Nassib's coming-out moment felt natural, and that may be just as momentous, gay former players said.
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(Mahlia Posey/The Washington Post)
Democrats in the Senate have two options right now to strengthen voting rights: Passing the For the People Act or the John Lewis Voting Rights Act. Here’s why neither path will be easy.
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Ahuja will head the Office of Personnel Management with no support from Senate Republicans, who voted against her based on her support for the academic movement known as critical race theory.
Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) is impeding the confirmation of James Kvaal, President Biden’s pick to head higher-education policy at the Education Department, to secure commitments on student loan reforms.
Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-R.I.) speaks during the confirmation hearing for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett in October. (Demetrius Freeman/The Post)
Questions remained about whether the club’s membership is all-White as the senator and the club have declined to provide details.
They include Secretary of State Antony Blinken and Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas.
The data are sparse, but the outcome probably wouldn't have changed.
Kim’s renewed efforts to regulate how North Korean citizens think and look comes as South Korean and Western pop culture continue to seep into the country.
With government forces stretched thin, officials are appealing for help from local fighters.
A vigil in Teplice, Czech Republic, on June 22, three days after a Roma man died following his detention by police. (AP)
Roma community members are calling for an investigation, but police said that drugs, not the police, caused the man’s death.
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The National Weather Service in Spokane, Wash., is referring to the episode as a “historic and dangerous heat wave,” while noting “this won’t just be one day in the 100s.”
Maki was returned to the San Francisco Zoo two days after he disappeared.  (Marianne Hale)
As much of the world comes out of the pandemic lockdown for Pride celebrations, we asked readers to share why and how they celebrate.
Six unvaccinated employees at a government building tested positive for the coronavirus within a two-week period, Manatee County Administrator Scott Hopes said.
The Montgomery County executive called it “alarming” that the state would threaten funding for other road projects after the governor’s proposal failed to gain support at the region's planning board.
Darrion Marsh stands at the spot in Virginia Beach where his best friend Donovon Lynch was killed by police in March. (Julia Rendleman for The Post)
Darrion Marsh says his best friend, Donovon Lynch, was not brandishing a gun when he was shot by the police. Two officers contend otherwise.
The chaos led to at least one arrest and a summons for trespassing.
(iStock; Post illustration)
An increasing number of workers who have benefited from the flexibility of remote work are dreading the call to return to the office.
Regulators will assess whether the Silicon Valley giant violated competition rules in favoring its own advertising display technology over that of rivals.
Trading cards, hot in the 1980s and early ’90s, have again become coveted.
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Mark Robert Rank, a professor of social welfare at Washington University in St. Louis, is a co-author of "Poorly Understood: What America Gets Wrong About Poverty."
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Former “Bachelorette” star Rachel Lindsay and her husband, Bryan Abasolo, in 2018. (Lisa Lake/Getty Images for SugarHouse Casino)
The Nobel Prize winner talks about the pandemic; his latest novel, “Klara and the Sun”; fatherhood and more.
The British publisher made children’s books popular; 100 years ago his name was suggested for a new U.S. prize.
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