The top two Justice Department officials determined that evidence was insufficient to allege President Trump had obstructed justice, sparking concerns that they rushed to a judgment no one asked them to make.
“How can they be trusted again?” is the gist of their aggressive strategy.
Syrian youths walk past a billboard with a picture of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad in Damascus. (AFP/Getty Images)
Syrian youths walk past a billboard with a picture of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad in Damascus. (AFP/Getty Images)
Destroyed buildings in the Yarmuk Palestinian refugee camp in Damascus in 2018. (AFP/Getty Images)
Destroyed buildings in the Yarmuk Palestinian refugee camp in Damascus in 2018. (AFP/Getty Images)
Syrians line up for gas canisters in the Salah al-Din district of the northern city of Aleppo. (AFP/Getty Images)
Syrians line up for gas canisters in the Salah al-Din district of the northern city of Aleppo. (AFP/Getty Images)
For the first time, those living in the pro-government areas that were spared the worst are experiencing some of the harshest deprivations, including in the capital, Damascus.
Telling stories about poor health, disrupted families and lost careers, women urged an advisory panel to recommend long-term research, bans or restrictions on certain products.
Play the latest episode of Post Reports, the premier daily podcast from The Washington Post.
The legal filing Monday in the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals said that the Justice Department now fully supports a federal judge’s ruling in December that the entire Affordable Care Act is unconstitutional.
The high-profile lawyer was arrested and charged in what prosecutors called a brazen bid to extort millions from Nike by threatening to damage its image.
Like they’ve done so many times before, parent and student activists turned additional loss into a call for change.
D.C. schoolteacher Abby Maslin struggled for years to keep her family together as her husband slowly recovered. She chronicles their wrenching journey in a new book.
Energy demand across the globe grew by 2.3 percent over the past year, according to a report from the International Energy Agency.
While Congress delays food-stamp funding, impoverished Puerto Rico residents have already started cutting back.
(Monica Akhtar/The Washington Post)
What to watch for as Barr releases more on the Mueller report
What to watch for as Barr releases more on the Mueller report
Play Video 3:34
6 geniuses who didn’t get the credit they deserved — at first
Play Video 2:37
'This could happen anywhere': Police investigate possible arson at California mosque
Play Video 1:16
Did Mueller ‘exonerate’ Trump? It depends who you ask.
Play Video 2:26
Market Watch
Dow 25,516.83
Today 0.06%
S&P 2,798.36
Today 0.08%
NASDAQ 7,637.54
Today 0.07%
Last Updated:03/25/2019
From Our Advertisers
This content is paid for by the advertiser and published by WP BrandStudio. The Washington Post newsroom was not involved in the creation of this content. Learn more about WP BrandStudio.