Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms and New Orleans Mayor LaToya Cantrell join The Washington Post’s Robert Costa for back-to-back interviews on how they’re combating the coronavirus in their cities.
  • Apr 28
Highlights
Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms has been critical of Georgia Governor Brian Kemp’s decision to reopen part of the state despite an increase in covid-19 cases. She say the state is going in the wrong direction. “We are lifting our foot off of the pedal, and we’re not out of the woods.’
  • Apr 28
Georgia officials are investigating a racist text received by Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms after she criticized Georgia Governor Brian Kemp’s decision to reopen parts of Georgia. Responding to the text, Bottoms said, ‘I was not elected mayor to be a coward... I will not let a cowardly text frighten me or silence me.’
  • Apr 28
When asked what the city is doing to help its homeless population or those who may become homeless because of the coronavirus pandemic, Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms said the city is working with utilities and private owners to not shut off services or evict tenants. “We said very early on that we would not disconnect water service, we suspended towing and ticketing in the public right away…We’ve asked [housing partners] to stay evictions.”
  • Apr 28
When asked whether former Vice President Joe Biden or any high-ranking Democrats have contacted her about potentially joining his ticket, Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms said she’s honored to be a part of the conversation but she’s focused on leading her city out of the coronavirus pandemic.
  • Apr 28
Full Interview
Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms joins The Washington Post’s Robert Costa to discuss how she is combating the coronavirus in her city
  • Apr 28
Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms
Atlanta, Ga.
Keisha Lance Bottoms is the 60th Mayor of Atlanta. A daughter of Atlanta, Mayor Bottoms is committed to realizing her vision of One Atlanta – an affordable, resilient and equitable Atlanta – which stands as a model city for both commerce and compassion. A lifelong public servant, Mayor Bottoms is the only Mayor in Atlanta’s history to have served in all three branches of government, serving as a judge and City Councilmember before being sworn in as Mayor. Under Mayor Bottoms’ leadership, the City of Atlanta led the historically successful staging of Super Bowl LIII, which included unprecedented community benefits – a $2.4 million renovation of John F. Kennedy Park on Atlanta’s Westside, more than 20,000 trees planted throughout the community and the seamless coordination of 40 federal, state and local public safety agencies. Mayor Bottoms is the daughter of Sylvia Robinson and R&B icon Major Lance. She resides in historic Southwest Atlanta with her husband, Derek W. Bottoms, their four children- Lance, Langston, Lennox and Lincoln, and their family dog, Logan.
Highlights
Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards extended the state’s stay-at-home order to May 15, which now aligns with the stay-at-home order issued by New Orleans Mayor LaToya Cantrell. She says she appreciates his decision, but added that if New Orleans needs to extend its stay-at-home order beyond the 15th, it will do so. It’s not about the date, it will aways be about the data, as it relates to the decisions that I have to make as mayor of the city.’
  • Apr 28
When asked what she would need in Phase 4 of congressional negotiations for federal funds, New Orleans Mayor LaToya Cantrell said, “The federal CARE Act, the dollars do not cover our losses as a city. I’m looking at about $150 million deficit…The losses of revenue from tax dollars, it doesn’t cover that…Cities, we need the dollars to cover our losses.”
  • Apr 28
When asked whether she sees Mardi Gras 2021 happening as scheduled, New Orleans Mayor LaToya Cantrell said, ‘We will let the data dictate the dates.’
  • Apr 28
New Orleans Mayor LaToya Cantrell has recommended that all remaining 2020 festivals be pushed to 2021. She says the ongoing coronavirus pandemic and the upcoming hurricane season, which is expected to be an active one, influenced her decision.
  • Apr 28
Full Interview
New Orleans Mayor LaToya Cantrell joins The Washington Post’s Robert Costa to discuss how she is combating the coronavirus in her city
  • Apr 28
Mayor LaToya Cantrell
New Orleans, La.
Mayor Cantrell’s life has been steeped in community service. As a little girl, her grandmother would bring her to neighborhood meetings, and by the age of 13, she was serving as secretary for her local chamber of commerce. “My soul found its home in New Orleans,” is how Mayor Cantrell describes her arrival in 1990 as a student at Xavier University. After graduation, she and her husband, Jason, bought a home in the Broadmoor neighborhood, and Cantrell became an active member of her new community. As the President of the Broadmoor Improvement Association, Cantrell led the neighborhood’s redevelopment following Hurricane Katrina and the levee failures. Flooding decimated Broadmoor, but through citizen engagement and Cantrell’s leadership, Broadmoor is now considered an international model for disaster recovery. Elected to the City Council in 2012, Cantrell has prioritized improving people’s lives. On May 7, 2018, Mayor Cantrell was sworn in as the first female Mayor of New Orleans, just in time to celebrate the city’s tricentennial, or 300th anniversary. She is a dedicated wife to her husband, Jason, proud mother of her daughter, RayAnn, and a parishioner at Blessed Trinity Catholic Church.
Interviewed by Robert Costa
The Washington Post
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