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Acts of Faith

‘There’s power in love’: Read the fiery sermon at the royal wedding by the Episcopal Church’s Michael Curry

May 19, 2018 at 9:36 AM

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The Most Rev. Michael Curry delivered the sermon during the Royal wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle. The sermon was a nod to the African American experience. (Victoria Walker/The Washington Post)

The Most Rev. Michael Curry, the first African American to preside over the Episcopal Church, focused his sermon at the royal wedding between Prince Harry and Meghan Markle on Saturday on “the redemptive power of love.”

Drawing from quotes from civil rights leader the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., American slaves and a Jesuit theologian, his sermon centered on the biblical teachings of Jesus.

“Jesus did not get an honorary doctorate for dying,” Curry said. “He wasn’t getting anything out of it. He gave up his life, he sacrificed his life for the good of others, for the well-being of the world, for us. That’s what love is.”

“Love can be sacrificial, and in so doing, become redemptive,” he said. “That way of unselfish, sacrificial, redemptive love changes lives.”

Related: [Royal wedding 2018: Prince Harry, Meghan Markle marry]

Curry, who was installed as presiding bishop of the U.S.-based member of the Anglican Communion on Nov. 1, 2015, is the son of an outspoken civil rights activist who helped bring an end to segregated schools in Buffalo. As bishop in North Carolina, he was one of the first to allow same-sex marriages to be performed in churches there and often speaks on progressive issues. Curry did not know the couple personally before the wedding, according a spokeswoman for the Episcopal Church, but he met them before the ceremony. “When I was told I said, ‘You’ve got to be kidding me,’ ” he joked of being chosen to deliver the sermon. “Is this an April Fool’s Day prank?”

Here is a video and transcript of the sermon he gave at the wedding:

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Bishop Michael Curry, the first African American to preside over the Episcopal Church, delivered a sermon at the royal wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan on May 19. (Reuters)

The late Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. once said, and I quote: “We must discover the power of love, the redemptive power of love. And when we discover that, we will be able to make of this old world a new world. Love is the only way.”

There’s power in love. Do not underestimate it. Don’t even over-sentimentalize it. There’s power, power in love. If you don’t believe me, think about a time when you first fell in love. The whole world seemed to center around you and your beloved. There’s power, power in love, not just in its romantic forms, but any form, any shape of love. There’s a certain sense in which when you are loved and you know it, when someone cares for you and you know it, when you love and you show it. It actually feels right. There’s something right about it. There’s a reason for it. It has to do with the source.

We were made by a power of love. Our lives were meant and are meant to be lived in that love. That’s why we are here. Ultimately the source of love is God himself. The source of all of our lives.

There’s an old medieval poem that says: “Where true love is found, God himself is there.” The New Testament says it this way. “Beloved, let us love one another, because love is of God; And those who love are born of God and know God. Those who not love does not know God. Why? For God is love.”

There’s power in love. There’s power in love to help and heal when nothing else can. There’s power in love to lift up and liberate when nothing else will. There’s power in love to show us the way to live. … But love is not only about a young couple. The power of love is demonstrated by the fact that we’re all here. Two young people fell in love, and we all showed up. It’s not just for and about a young couple whom we rejoice with. It’s more than that.

Jesus of Nazareth on one occasion was asked by a lawyer to sum up the essence of the teachings of Moses. He went back and reached back to the Hebrew Scriptures to Deuteronomy and Leviticus, and Jesus said, “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, all your soul, all your mind and all your strength. This is the first and great commandment. The second is like it: Love your neighbor as yourself.” Then in Matthew’s version, he added, he said, on these two, love of God and love of neighbor, hang all the law, all the prophets, everything that Moses wrote, everything from the holy prophets, everything in the scriptures, everything that God has been trying to tell the world. Love God, love your neighbors, and while you’re at it, love yourself.

Someone once said that Jesus began the most revolutionary movement in human history: a movement ground on the unconditional love of God for the world and a movement mandating people to live and love.

And in so doing, to change not only their lives but the very life of the world itself! I’m talking about the power, real power, power to change the world.

If you don’t believe me, well, there were some old slaves in America’s antebellum South who explained the dynamic power of love and why it has the power to transform. They explained it this way. They sang a spiritual even in the midst of their captivity. It’s one that says there is a balm in Gilead, a healing balm, something that can make things right. There is a balm in Gilead to make the wounded whole. There is a balm in Gilead to heal the sin-sick soul. One of the stanzas explains why: It says, if you cannot preach like Peter, you cannot pray like Paul, you just tell the love of Jesus, how he died to save us all. That’s the balm in Gilead. This way of love is the way of life. They got it.

He died to save us all. He didn’t die for anything he could get out of it. Jesus did not get an honorary doctorate for dying. He wasn’t getting anything out of it. He gave up his life, he sacrificed his life for the good of others, for the well-being of the world, for us. That’s what love is. Love is not selfish or self-centered. Love can be sacrificial, and in so doing, become redemptive. That way of unselfish, sacrificial, redemptive love changes lives. And it can change this world.

Stop and imagine for a minute. Think and imagine. Think and imagine a world where love is the way.

Imagine our homes and families when love is the way. Imagine our neighborhoods and communities where love is the way. Imagine governments and nations where love is the way. Imagine business and commerce when love is the way. Imagine this tired old world when love is the way. When love is the way — unselfish, sacrificial, redemptive — when love is the way, then no child will go to bed hungry in this world ever again. When love is the way, we will let justice roll down like a mighty stream, and righteousness like an ever-flowing brook.

When love is the way, poverty would become history. When love is the way, the earth will be a sanctuary. When love is the way, we will lay our swords and shields down by the riverside to study war no more. When love is the way, there’s plenty of room for all of God’s children. When love is the way, we actually treat each other, well, like we are actually family. When love is the way, we know that God is the source of us all, and we are brothers and sisters and children of God. Brothers and sisters — that’s a new heaven, a new earth, a new world, a new human family. Let me tell you something. Ol’ Solomon was right in the Old Testament. That’s fire.

French Jesuit Pierre Teilhard de Chardin was arguably one of the great minds, great spirits of the 20th century. Jesuit, Roman Catholic priest, scientist, a scholar, a true mystic. Some of his writings from his scientific background as well as his theological one, some of his writings said, as others have said, that the discovery and harnessing of fire was one of the great technological discoveries of human history. Fire, to a great extent, made human civilization possible. Fire made it possible to cook food and to provide sanitary ways of eating, which reduced the spread of disease in its time. Fire made it possible to heat warm environments and thereby marking human migration a possibility even into colder climates. Fire made it possible — there was no Bronze Age without fire, no Iron Age without fire, no Industrial Revolution without fire. … Anybody get here in a car today? An automobile? Nod your heads if you did; I know there were some carriages. Those of us who came in cars, the controlled, harnessed fire made that possible.

I know that the Bible says, and I believe it that Jesus walked on water, but I have to tell you I didn’t walk across the Atlantic Ocean to get here. Controlled fire in that plane got me here. Fire makes it possible for us to text, and tweet, and email, and Instagram, and Facebook, and socially be dysfunctional with each other. Fire makes that possible, and de Chardin said fire was one of the great discoveries in all of human history. He went on to say if humanity ever harnesses the energy of fire again, if humanity ever captured the energies of love, it will be the second time in the history that will have discovered fire.

Dr. King was right. We must discover love, the redemptive power of love. And when we do that, we will be able to make of this old world a new world.

My brother, my sister, God love you, God bless you. And may God hold us all in those almighty hands of love.

This story has been updated to include additional quotes in the introduction.

Guests gather inside the grounds of Windsor Castle ahead of the wedding ceremony.
The view along the Long Walk as spectators gather.
Guests are pictured as they arrive inside the Chapel.
A member of staff holds an order of service inside the grounds of Windsor Castle.
Amal and George Clooney arrive.
Pippa Middleton and James Matthews arrive.
Tennis player Serena Williams (center, left) and her husband American Internet entrepreneur and investor Alexis Ohanian (center, right) arrive.
David and Victoria Beckham arrive.
Former Prime Minister John Major and wife Norma arrive.
Prince’s Harry’s friend, British singer Joss Stone, right, arrives.
From left, Eliza Spencer, Louis Spencer, Victoria Aitken and Kitty Spencer arrive for the wedding ceremony.
Former England rugby player Jonny Wilkinson, left, and his wife Shelley Jenkins arrive.
From left, Lizzie Wilson, Guy Pelly, James Meade and Lady Laura Marsham arrive.
British musician Marcus Mumford and British actor Carey Mulligan arrive.
Former england footballer David Beckham and wife Victoria Beckham speak with British musician Elton John and partner David Furnish before the wedding ceremony.
From left, The Duke of York, Princess Beatrice, Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank sit ahead of the wedding ceremony.
Meghan Markle leaves Cliveden House Hotel in Taplow.
Meghan Markle, right, and her mother Doria Ragland leave Cliveden House Hotel in Taplow.
Britain’s Queen Elizabeth arrives.
Prince Harry arrives with his best man Prince William.
Prince Harry and Prince William arrive for the wedding ceremony.
Prince Harry, left, arrives with his best man Prince William.
Britain’s Prince Harry and best man Prince William arrive for the wedding ceremony.
Prince Harry, right, accompanied by his best man the Duke of Cambridge, arrives in St George’s Chapel.
Bridesmaids and pageboys arrive.
Princess Charlotte of Cambridge arrives.
Pageboy Jasper Dyer arrives.
Meghan Markle is driven by the Long Walk to St George’s Chapel.
People cheer as the car with Meghan Markle arrives.
Meghan Markle, right. and her mother, Doria Ragland, arrive.
Prince Charles, Prince of Wales and Britain’s Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall wait in the chapel.
Prince Harry, right, sits with his best man the Duke of Cambridge in St George’s Chapel.
Doria Ragland arrives for the wedding ceremony of Britain's Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex and US actress Meghan Markle at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle, in Windsor, on May 19, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / Gareth FullerGARETH FULLER/AFP/Getty Images
Meghan Markle waves as she arrives.
Meghan Markle arrives at St George’s Chapel.
Meghan Markle arrives.
Meghan Markle arrives.
Members of the armed forces parade inside Windsor Castle outside St George’s Chapel during the wedding.
Meghan Markle walks down the aisle in St George’s Chapel.
The Prince of Wales leads Meghan Markle up the aisle of St George’s Chapel.
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle watch as the bridesmaids and page boys walk down the aisle.
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle are seen in St George’s Chapel.
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle arrive at the High Altar.
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle are seen in St George’s Chapel.
Prince Harry removes the veil of Meghan Markle.
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle are seen in St George’s Chapel.
Meghan Markle smiles during her wedding ceremony.
Bishop Michael Curry speaks during the wedding ceremony.
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle hold hands during their wedding ceremony.
Britain’s Prince Harry places the ring on Meghan Markle during their wedding ceremony.
Prince Harry places a ring on Meghan Markle’s finger.
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle depart from St George’s Chapel.
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle leave St George’s Chapel.
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle kiss on the steps of St George’s Chapel.
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle leave after their wedding at St. George’s Chapel.
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle kiss on the steps of St George’s Chapel in Windsor Castle after their wedding.
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle kiss as they leave after their wedding at St. George’s Chapel.
Prince Harry and his wife Meghan, Duchess of Sussex leave from the West Door of St George’s Chape.
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle leave St George’s Chapel.
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle leave after their wedding ceremony .
Princess Charlotte, left, waves by her mother Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge after attending the wedding ceremony.
Prince George leaves after the wedding.
Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, Prince William, and Prince Harry’s nephew and page boy Prince George leave after attending the wedding ceremony.
Prince Harry and his wife Meghan, Duchess of Sussex ride in a horse-drawn Ascot Landau carriage along The Long Walk towards Windsor Castle.
Prince Harry and his wife Meghan wave as they ride a horse-drawn carriage after their wedding ceremony at St George’s Chapel.
Prince Harry and his wife Meghan Markle ride a horse-drawn carriage after their wedding ceremony.
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle leave St George’s Chapel in Windsor Castle after their wedding.
Britain’s Prince Harry and his wife Meghan Markle ride a horse-drawn carriage along the Long Walk.
Meghan, Duchess of Sussex rides in the Ascot Landau carriage during the procession after getting married.
Prince Harry and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex leave Windsor Castle in the Ascot Landau carriage during a procession after getting married at St Georges Chapel.
Photo Gallery: Britain’s Prince Harry and America’s Meghan Markle become the Duke and Duchess of Sussex after their marriage in Windsor, England.

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At Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s royal wedding, some things very old and some things new


Sarah Pulliam Bailey is a religion reporter, covering how faith intersects with politics and culture. She runs Acts of Faith, The Washington Post's religion blog. Before joining The Post, she was a national correspondent based in New York City for Religion News Service.

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