Democracy Dies in Darkness

Post Nation

New details emerge about Las Vegas shooter Stephen Paddock and girlfriend Marilou Danley

By William Wan, Sandhya Somashekhar, Marwa Eltagouri

October 6, 2017 at 10:24 AM

Watch more!
On Oct. 1, a crowd of thousands had gathered in Las Vegas for a music festival. Then bullets rained down from the sky. Survivors describe the shock and terror of the worst mass shooting in recent U.S. history. (The Washington Post)

FBI agents spent Wednesday questioning Marilou Danley, the longtime girlfriend of the Las Vegas gunman and considered an integral key by authorities trying to understand what drove Stephen Paddock to open fire from his casino hotel room.

Paddock killed at least 58 people and injured more than 500 on the Las Vegas Strip before killing himself. Danley was in the Philippines at the time of the attack and arrived in Los Angeles late Tuesday. She was met by FBI agents at the airport and questioned Wednesday.

After being questioned, Danley said in a statement that she had no clue about his plans to carry out the massacre and pledged to cooperate with authorities struggling to determine what sparked the deadliest mass shooting in modern American history.

“I knew Stephen Paddock as a kind, caring, quiet man,” said Danley in a statement read by her lawyer Matthew Lombard, a criminal defense attorney. “He never said anything to me or took any action that I was aware of that I understood in any way to be a warning that something horrible like this was going to happen.”

Watch more!
Stephen Paddock was identified by police as the gunman in the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history. Here's what you need to know about him. (Monica Akhtar/The Washington Post)

Danley, 62, said Paddock bought her a ticket about two weeks ago to visit her family in the Philippines and then wired money to purchase a home for Danley and her family.

“I was grateful, but honestly, I was worried, that first, the unexpected trip home, and then the money, was a way of breaking up with me,” she said. “It never occurred to me in any way whatsoever that he was planning violence against anyone.”

As investigators continue to search for a Paddock’s motive and question Danley, new details have emerged about both.

Danley is from the Philippines, but she lived for many years in Australia, where authorities have confirmed she is a citizen.

Danley has two sisters who live in Australia, according to news outlets there and old Facebook posts by the sisters, which have been deleted in recent days.

Australian media have identified the sisters as Liza Werner and Amelia Manango. On a Facebook account that has been deleted, Werner is friends with Danley’s ex-husband and others Danley knew. And in a picture posted by Werner, Danley appears with the two women as well as Danley’s daughter. The caption reads, “Sheila and the three sisters.”

The sisters did not respond to messages or calls.

But two women identified as her sisters told an Australian television network Wednesday that they believe Paddock arranged Danley’s trip to the Philippines so that she wouldn’t interfere with his plans.

She was shocked to know she was leaving, the women told Seven Network Australia on camera with their faces blurred.

“He sent her away so that he can plan what he is planning without interruptions,” one of the women said. “In that sense I thank him for sparing my sister’s life. But that won’t compensate the [dead] people’s lives.”

Watch more!
One friend took a bullet to the shoulder, the other took one to the knee. But once they got to the hospital, they couldn't find each other. (Jorge Ribas, Whitney Shefte/The Washington Post)

Authorities say that before the shooting, Paddock transferred a large amount of money to the Philippines — close to $100,000. His brother, Eric Paddock, said he thought the gunman may have been trying to arrange for Danley to be abroad before carrying out the massacre.

Danley is considered a critical witness in trying to decipher Paddock’s motive, according to a person familiar with the probe. While investigators have described Danley as a “person of interest,” they have not suggested that she is considered an accomplice or involved in any way.

Federal agents — who are assisting the Las Vegas police in the investigation — have essentially two critical questions for Danley: Did she have any idea what motivated him, and did she have any knowledge of what was about to take place and not alert authorities?

Given how little has emerged in Paddock’s past that could foreshadow the attack, the “best lead is through this girlfriend,” said Sen. Dean Heller (R-Nev.).

The women identified by Seven Network Australia as her sisters agreed.

“No one can put the puzzles together — no one except Marilou,” one of the women said. “Because Steve is not here to talk anymore. Only Marilou can maybe help.

“She probably was even more shocked than us because she is more closer to him than us. You know, to be able to find out the person you love and live with can do such a thing? And you thought you know the person yourself.”

Watch more!
Survivors return to the scene in Las Vegas with the hopes of gathering belongings left behind in the chaos of the country's deadliest mass shooting in modern history. (Alice Li, Dalton Bennett/The Washington Post)

How they met

As early as August 2013, Danley was already living with Paddock, according to public records. She was separated at that point but still married to another man, Geary Danley.

Geary and Marilou Danley were married in Las Vegas in 1990.

In 2002, Geary and Marilou Danley moved into a home in a brand-new development in Sparks, Nev. Like everyone else on the street, they bought the lot and had a home built on it, said John Heidenreich, her neighbor two doors down. He said the Danleys’ house was the first completed in the 15-home neighborhood. He recalled Danley as a friendly woman who showed up at neighborhood barbecues and other social events on the block.

Danley was working then as a high-limit hostess at the Atlantis Casino Resort Spa in Reno, Nev.

“I guess she just liked that casino lifestyle,” Heidenreich said.

“They seemed like great people,” he said of the couple.

Heidenreich said he was surprised when the couple separated. Danley’s former stepdaughters, who now live in Arkansas, told local TV reporters that they separated in the spring of 2013, at which point Geary moved back to his native Arkansas.

Related: [VIDEO: Marilou Danley’s former stepdaughters speak out]

According to court records, the couple filed for divorce on Feb. 25, 2015, and it was finalized the next day. During her divorce, Marilou Danley listed a downtown Reno apartment as her address, which was owned by Paddock.

Paddock met Danley while she was working at the Atlantis Casino, said his brother Eric Paddock.

Paddock was a frequent gambler at the casino where Danley once worked. He was such a regular that his entire family once took over the top floor at the casino’s expense, his brother said.

“They were adorable — big man, tiny woman. He loved her. He doted on her,” Eric said at his home in Florida. The two often gambled side by side, he said.

Employees at a Starbucks in Mesquite, Nev., however, described the couple’s relationship differently. A supervisor at the coffee shop told the Los Angeles Times that Paddock often berated Danley in public. The Starbucks is the only one in town and is inside the Virgin River Casino.

“It happened a lot,” Esperanza Mendoza, supervisor of the Starbucks, told the Times. He would verbally abuse her when Danley asked to use his casino card to buy food or other things inside the casino, Esperanza said.

“He would glare down at her and say — with a mean attitude — ‘You don’t need my casino card for this. I’m paying for your drink, just like I’m paying for you.’ Then she would softly say, ‘Okay’ and step back behind him. He was so rude to her in front of us.”

Related: [Did Las Vegas gunman follow UT Tower shooter Charles Whitman’s playbook?]

Her family

Danley has a daughter in Los Angeles and a grandchild, according to relatives and public records.

Her daughter, Sheila Darcey Linton, is an artist who lives in Los Angeles and is married to Micah Linton, scion of a wealthy business titan. Her father-in-law, Michael Linton, is the CEO of Promega, a biochemistry company.

The couple have one child together, according to a 2014 picture posted on Micah Linton’s Facebook account. And they live in an expensive home in Venice with a market value of roughly $2 million.

On Wednesday, the five-bedroom home had sheets tacked up across the windows, preventing anyone from seeing inside, including TV news vans camped out in front waiting for any sign of Danley or her daughter.

Danley’s daughter describes herself online as an artist and tech worker. In a biography posted on her personal website, she cites her mother’s strong influence on her.

She said she tried to be a “dutiful Asian daughter to make my mother proud” by pursuing a degree in computer science in college. She later switched her focus to fine arts, she said. “Fortunately, my mother, who was shocked and disappointed, didn’t disown or belittle my decision,” Linton wrote. “Instead, she stood by me and demanded the same excellence in this path as she did in the last. Her love never wavered. It was merely my perspective of her that changed.”

Life with Paddock

At one point, Danley worked for an airline company, said Elizabeth Tyree, a neighbor in Reno, where Danley and Paddock lived together in a retirement community. Danley later worked for Avon, the cosmetic sales company and tried to sell their products to other residents, Tyree said.

Paddock, 64, bought and sold several properties in recent years as a way of making money, according to relatives and property records. The couple traveled all the time, never staying at any of their homes in Reno and Mesquite, Nev., very long. Neighbors say the couple would disappeared for long stretches — sometimes for months at a time — during Paddock’s gambling trips to casinos.

In Mesquite, an hour’s drive from Las Vegas, the couple left mixed impressions among residents.

Many recalled seeing Paddock at a bar named Peggy Sue’s and Eureka Casino. They described him as silent, sullen — never talking to anyone.

He was a regular at the Virgin River, a smaller, dingy casino with card games and machines — from penny slots up to $1 machines.

In Reno, neighbors also described Paddock as standoffish but recalled Danley as extremely sweet and friendly. Next-door neighbor Tyree said Danley hugged her when she saw her.

This summer, Tyree saw Danley and Paddock moving a mattress and got a glimpse inside their garage, which was completely empty. Tyree asked Danley whether they were moving, and Danley said they had bought a new house but were not moving out of Reno.

Another neighbor, Susan Page, who moved next door to the couple this summer, said she had not seen them since August. Paddock had recently bought a new silver minivan, she said, and Danley drove an SUV. On the third week of August, Paddock left the house. Soon after, Page said, Danley packed up her car as well, as if she were moving away.

The gunman

More details have also emerged on Paddock, the gunman.

A real estate broker who helped Paddock sell multiple properties in California more than a decade ago said the future gunman expressed dislike for taxes and the government — even selling off a series of buildings in California to move his money to the low-tax havens of Texas and Nevada.

But the agent, who asked not to be identified discussing Paddock, said Paddock did not appear to be political or ideological. A person familiar with the investigation into the massacre said these anti-government views alone did not explain why Paddock would head to a 32nd floor suite at the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino, break out the windows and open fire into a crowd of unsuspecting citizens.

The emerging portrait of Paddock suggests a man of considerable means who liked guns, gambling and women, but who so disliked interacting with people that he sought to avoid talking to them.

Property records show Paddock sold several low-end apartment buildings and commercial buildings in California in the 2000s before purchasing an apartment building in Texas and homes in retirement communities in Florida and Nevada. Between 2003 and 2004, Paddock sold at least three commercial properties in California for a total of more than $5 million.

Paddock would buy apartments, move into them to keep an eye on his investment, but “still would employ other people to talk to the tenants because he didn’t want to talk to the tenants,” the broker said.

The aversion to human interaction even extended into Paddock’s flying, said the broker, who, like Paddock, enjoyed piloting personal planes.

At the time of their acquaintance, Paddock had a sleek new aircraft — a Cirrus SR20. On the handful of flights they made together, Paddock would map out his path — steering away from controlled areas — just to avoid having to talk to the air traffic controllers, the broker said.

Paddock’s dislike for human contact, the real estate broker said, was in part why he preferred playing video poker, a type of gambling that does not require interaction with other players.

Paddock’s wardrobe did not bespeak of a man of wealth, said the broker. Paddock often went out unshaven, in sweat pants and flip-flops, even on his thrice-weekly excursions to casinos, where he ate at the buffet.

Paddock stored the Cirrus at a Mesquite Metro Airport hangar between 2007 and 2009, according airport workers. The airport staff had little recollection of him, said Lt. Brian Parrish of the Mesquite Police, “because he paid his bills on time and didn’t cause trouble.”

His flying hobby appeared to come to an end in 2010. Because of a medical restriction — he needed glasses for near vision — Paddock would have been required to renew a medical certificate to fly. But once his expired in 2010, he never tried to renew it, a Federal Aviation Administration official said.

From 1976 to 1985, Paddock worked federal government jobs: as a letter carrier for the Postal Service, an agent for the IRS  and an auditor for U.S. government’s Defense Contract Audit Agency, according to the Office of Personnel Management.

Neighbors in several states where he owned homes in retirement communities described him as surly and unfriendly.

His Father and Brothers

Relatives say the roots of Paddock’s loner lifestyle may have been planted July 28, 1960. On that day, when Paddock was 7, a neighbor from across the street took him swimming. The neighbor at the time told a local newspaper that she knew authorities were coming for his father, a bank robber, and she wanted to spare the boy the trauma of seeing his father hauled away by authorities.

Related: [Las Vegas shooter’s father was a bank robber — and on the FBI’s Most Wanted list]

From that point on, Paddock’s family was never the same.

His mother struggled to raise him and his brothers on her own. His father escaped from prison — twice — and had little more contact with them, relatives say. As they grew older, Stephen, the eldest, and the youngest brother, Eric, kept in touch, but Stephen Paddock drifted almost completely out of touch with his two other brothers, Bruce and Patrick.

Eric said that Stephen stopped talking to his brother Bruce because Bruce used to beat him up when they were kids and that Stephen stopped talking to Patrick because they’re very different people.

Even with Eric he never talked much. They created a lucrative real estate investment business together, but Stephen would only text Eric now and then.

“We didn’t talk much. We talked when there was something to talk about,” Eric Paddock said. “Steve had no help. Steve did not take help. He was a stand-alone guy.”

Choking up as he talked, Eric said, “Steve was like a dad surrogate. He took me camping. I liked my brother. He was a good guy.”

High school

Stephen Paddock went to John H. Francis Polytechnic High School in the Los Angeles suburbs, his brother said.

Judy Smith Nelson, a retired federal worker living in Las Vegas, was stunned when she first saw that she and the alleged shooter were the same age — 64. Then a friend texted her a picture from an old high school yearbook.

“I couldn’t believe it. I recognized the face. We had been classmates,” Nelson said Tuesday.

As investigators continued searching for a motive, anyone who had come into contact with Paddock over more than four decades began to wrestle with what they knew of the man and whether there had ever been clues of what would come.

Related: [Las Vegas gunman Stephen Paddock was a high-stakes gambler who ‘kept to himself’ before massacre]

Former California state senator Richard Alarcon, who had gotten his start as student body president of John H. Francis Polytechnic High School in 1971, posted a note to friends on Facebook on Tuesday saying he remembered playing basketball with Paddock at a neighborhood court.

Another classmate remembered Paddock showing up at a 20-year reunion and repeatedly angling to talk to her.

Nelson, in Las Vegas, fished through an old box of keepsakes and found a 10-year reunion program that contained a one-line description that each classmate had written. Paddock’s read: “Single, accountant, has traveled to Hollywood, lives in Sepulveda [Calif.]”

“We’re all just reeling, and here I have kind of a personal connection, being that we walked the same grounds, we were from the same area,” Nelson said.

After high school, Paddock attended Cal State Northridge. He was married and divorced twice. Both ex-wives — one in the Los Angeles area, the other in the Dallas suburbs — declined to talk to reporters.

Julie Tate, Abigail Hauslohner, Aaron Davis and Mark Berman in Washington; Ally Gravina in Reno, Nev.; William Dauber and Becca Rothschild in Los Angeles; Barbara Liston in Orlando; and Michael Lyle in Mesquite, Nev., contributed to this report, which has been updated.

LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 08: People visit a makeshift memorial near the sign welcoming visitors to Las Vegas on Sunday October 08, 2017 in Las Vegas, NV. Suspected gunman, Stephen Paddock shot and killed people attending the Route 91 Harvest Festival. He was known as being a high stakes gambler. (Photo by Matt McClain/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 08: People visit a makeshift memorial near the sign welcoming visitors to Las Vegas on Sunday October 08, 2017 in Las Vegas, NV. Suspected gunman, Stephen Paddock shot and killed people attending the Route 91 Harvest Festival. He was known as being a high stakes gambler. (Photo by Matt McClain/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 08: Shawna Laing visits a makeshift memorial near the sign welcoming visitors to Las Vegas on Sunday October 08, 2017 in Las Vegas, NV. Suspected gunman, Stephen Paddock shot and killed people attending the Route 91 Harvest Festival. He was known as being a high stakes gambler. (Photo by Matt McClain/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 7: 58 white doves are released in honor of the victims of last Sunday's mass shooting, at the culmination of a faith unity walk at Las Vegas City Hall on October 7, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. On October 1, Stephen Paddock killed at least 58 people and injured more than 450 after he opened fire on a large crowd at the Route 91 Harvest country music festival. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
A sign is pictured at a makeshift memorial set up for the victims of the Route 91 Harvest music festival mass shooting in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 7, 2017. REUTERS/Chris Wattie
A Las Vegas police officer takes part in a prayer at a makeshift memorial set up for the victims of the Route 91 Harvest music festival mass shooting in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 7, 2017. REUTERS/Chris Wattie
A pallbearer lays a rose next to a photo of Jack Beaton during his memorial service at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church in Bakersfield, Calif., on Saturday, Oct. 7, 2017. Beaton was a victim of the Oct. 1 mass shooting in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Silvia Flores)
Mourners console each another after the memorial service for Jack Beaton at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church in Bakersfield, Calif., on Saturday, Oct. 7, 2017. Beaton was a victim of the Oct. 1 mass shooting in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Silvia Flores)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 07: Investigators work the scene of the mass shooting where the Route 61 Harvest Festival was held last weekend on Saturday October 07, 2017 in Las Vegas, NV. Suspected gunman, Stephen Paddock shot and killed people attending the event from his room at Mandalay Bay. (Photo by Matt McClain/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 07: Las Vegas Fire & Rescue and Clark County Fire Department personnel hang a large American flag between their ladder trucks at Sam Boyd Stadium to welcome fans to the San Diego State Aztecs and UNLV football game and to honor victims of Sunday's mass shooting on October 7, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. On October 1, Stephen Paddock killed at least 58 people and injured more than 450 after he opened fire on a large crowd at the Route 91 Harvest country music festival. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 07: First responders release 58 balloons on the field in honor of the 58 victims killed in Sunday's mass shooting before a game between the San Diego State Aztecs and the UNLV Rebels at Sam Boyd Stadium on October 7, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. UNLV is holding activities before and during their game to honor first responders and victims of Sunday night's mass shooting. On October 1, Stephen Paddock killed at least 58 people and injured more than 450 after he opened fire on a large crowd at the Route 91 Harvest country music festival. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. San Diego State won 41-10. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 07: (L-R) William St. Clair wheels Addison Short, who was injured in Sunday's mass shooting, off the field during a pre-game ceremony as her mother, Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department Officer Stacy Short, escorts her before a game between the San Diego State Aztecs and the UNLV Rebels at Sam Boyd Stadium on October 7, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. UNLV is holding activities before and during their game to honor first responders and victims of the massacre. On October 1, Stephen Paddock killed at least 58 people and injured more than 450 after he opened fire on a large crowd at the Route 91 Harvest country music festival. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. San Diego State won 41-10. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 07: A UNLV fan holds up a #VegasStrong sign during a game between the San Diego State Aztecs and the UNLV Rebels at Sam Boyd Stadium on October 7, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. UNLV is holding activities before and during their game to honor first responders and victims of Sunday night's mass shooting. On October 1, Stephen Paddock killed at least 58 people and injured more than 450 after he opened fire on a large crowd at the Route 91 Harvest country music festival. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 06: Ann Gentry, of Los Angeles, CA visits a makeshift memorial on Friday October 06, 2017 in Las Vegas, NV. Suspected gunman, Stephen Paddock killed 59 people and wounded hundreds who were attending the Route 91 Harvest Festival. He was known as being a high stakes gambler (Photo by Matt McClain/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 06: Kristen Gunsch, 39, of CA, does yoga near a makeshift memorial on Friday October 06, 2017 in Las Vegas, NV. She referred to yoga as her version of prayer. Suspected gunman, Stephen Paddock killed 59 people and wounded hundreds who were attending the Route 91 Harvest Festival. He was known as being a high stakes gambler (Photo by Matt McClain/The Washington Post)
TOPSHOT - Ethan Avanzino grieves beside a white cross for his friend Cameron Robinson, one of 58 victims of Sunday night's mass shooting, on the Las Vegas Strip just south of the Mandalay Bay hotel, October 6, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. On October 1, 2017 Stephen Paddock killed at least 58 people and injured more than 450 after he opened fire on a large crowd at the Route 91 Harvest country music festival. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in US history. / AFP PHOTO / Robyn BeckROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 06: One of two Las Vegas unity ribbons painted on the football field at UNLV's Sam Boyd Stadium is shown on October 6, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. The team is honoring first responders and victims of Sunday night's mass shooting during their game against the San Diego State Aztecs on October 7. On October 1 Stephen Paddock killed at least 58 people and injured more than 450 after he opened fire on a large crowd at the Route 91 Harvest country music festival. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
Vegas Golden Knights defenseman Colin Miller (6) bows his head as he lines up with teammates and the Dallas Stars for a moment of silence for shooting victims in Las Vegas before an NHL hockey game in Dallas, Friday, Oct. 6, 2017. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
Ragne Domaas, of Norway, makes a heart symbol with her hands as her friend takes a photo Friday, Oct. 6, 2017, at Las Vegas' famous sign near a makeshift memorial for victims of a mass shooting in Las Vegas. Stephen Paddock opened fire on an outdoor music concert on Sunday killing dozens and injuring hundreds. (AP Photo/John Locher)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 05: People visit a makeshift memorial along the Las Vegas Strip on Thursday October 05, 2017 in Las Vegas, NV. Suspected gunman, Stephen Paddock killed 59 people and wounded hundreds who were attending the Route 91 Harvest Festival. He was known as being a high stakes gambler (Photo by Matt McClain/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 05: Monica Van Horn and her son, Luke Van Horn, 6, pray with others from Calvary Chapel Lone Mountain on Thursday October 05, 2017 in Las Vegas, NV. Suspected gunman, Stephen Paddock killed 59 people and wounded hundreds who were attending the Route 91 Harvest Festival. He was known as being a high stakes gambler (Photo by Matt McClain/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 05: Lindsay Meisner, bottom left, visits a makeshift memorial on Thursday October 05, 2017 in Las Vegas, NV. Suspected gunman, Stephen Paddock killed 59 people and wounded hundreds who were attending the Route 91 Harvest Festival. He was known as being a high stakes gambler (Photo by Matt McClain/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 4: People gathered under the Welcome to Fabulous Las Vegas sign for a vigil on Wednesday, October 4, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 4: Two women stops to pay tribute at vigil along Las Vegas Boulevard near Mandalay Bay hotel on Wednesday, October 4, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 4: People pay tribute for Sunday's night mass shooting victims at vigil along Las Vegas Boulevard near Mandalay Bay hotel on Wednesday, October 4, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 4: Officer Montano with Henderson Police Department is seen outside of Mandalay Bay hotel on Wednesday, October 4, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 4: People pay tribute for Sunday's night mass shooting victims at vigil along Las Vegas Boulevard near Mandalay Bay hotel on Wednesday, October 4, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 4: Aleca King, 42, of Las Vegas, NV, stops to pay tribute at vigil along Las Vegas Boulevard near Mandalay Bay hotel with her Chihuahua Falafel on Wednesday, October 4, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)
People hold candles and flashlights into the air during a memorial for Rachael Parker and Sandy Casey, Manhattan Beach city employees and victims of the October 1st Las Vegas Route 91 music festival mass shooting, in Manhattan Beach, California, U.S., October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 4: A Vegas Strong billboard is seen along Las Vegas Boulevard on Wednesday, October 4, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)
NEWTOWN, CT - OCTOBER 04: Dozens of people attend a vigil remembering the 58 people killed in Sunday's shooting in Las Vegas and calling for action against guns on October 4, 2017 in Newtown, Connecticut. The vigil, organized by the Newtown Action Alliance, was held outside the National Shooting Sport Foundation and looked to draw attention to gun violence in America. Twenty school children were killed at the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Newtown on December 14, 2012. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 3: A U.S. flag is lowered along the Las Vegas Strip a day after 59 people were killed and more than 500 wounded at the Route 91 Harvest Country Music Festival on Monday, October 2, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 3: Police officers are seen along the Las Vegas Strip a day after 59 people were killed and more than 500 wounded at the Route 91 Harvest Country Music Festival on Monday, October 2, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 3: Priscilla Olivas, 19, of Las Vegas, NV, lights up a candle at a street vigil that was held for the victims along the Las Vegas Strip a day after 59 people were killed and more than 500 wounded at the Route 91 Harvest Country Music Festival on Monday, October 2, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. Olivas was part of the cleaning crew at the concert when the shooting happened. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 03: Priscilla Olivas visits a makeshift memorial early on Tuesday October 03, 2017 in Las Vegas, NV. Suspected gunman, Stephen Paddock killed 59 people and wounded hundreds who were attending the Route 91 Harvest Festival. (Photo by Matt McClain/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 3: Tara Boze, center, wipes a tear at a street vigil with Steven Vasquez that was held for the victims along the Las Vegas Strip a day after 59 people were killed and more than 500 wounded at the Route 91 Harvest Country Music Festival on Monday, October 2, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 3: Flowers and signs are seen at a vigil that was held for the victims along the Las Vegas Strip a day after 59 people were killed and more than 500 wounded at the Route 91 Harvest Country Music Festival on Monday, October 2, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 3: Donated food and water are seen near a street vigil that was held for the victims along the Las Vegas Strip a day after 59 people were killed and more than 500 wounded at the Route 91 Harvest Country Music Festival on Monday, October 2, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 3: Flowers and signs are seen at a vigil that was held for the victims along the Las Vegas Strip a day after 59 people were killed and more than 500 wounded at the Route 91 Harvest Country Music Festival on Monday, October 2, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 3: Flowers were left on a fence near the vigil that was held for the victims along the Las Vegas Strip a day after 59 people were killed and more than 500 wounded at the Route 91 Harvest Country Music Festival on Monday, October 2, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 3: Mikko Bonilla, 30, of Minneapolis, MN, lights up a candle at a street vigil that was held for the victims along the Las Vegas Strip a day after 59 people were killed and more than 500 wounded at the Route 91 Harvest Country Music Festival on Monday, October 2, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 3: Steve Delgado, 22, of Las Vegas, NV, signs a poster at a street vigil that was held for the victims along the Las Vegas Strip a day after 59 people were killed and more than 500 wounded at the Route 91 Harvest Country Music Festival on Monday, October 2, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 03: Broken windows are seen at the Mandalay Bay hotel on Tuesday October 03, 2017 in Las Vegas, NV. Suspected gunman, Stephen Paddock killed 59 people and wounded hundreds from the hotel as the victims were attending the Route 91 Harvest Festival. (Photo by Matt McClain/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 3: Police officers are seen near the Venetian hotel along the Las Vegas Strip a day after 59 people were killed and more than 500 wounded at the Route 91 Harvest Country Music Festival on Monday, October 2, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 3: A Route 66 license plate is seen at a vigil that was held for the victims along the Las Vegas Strip a day after 59 people were killed and more than 500 wounded at the Route 91 Harvest Country Music Festival on Monday, October 2, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 3: A U.S. flag is placed in the middle of flowers and candles at a vigil that was held for the victims along the Las Vegas Strip a day after 59 people were killed and more than 500 wounded at the Route 91 Harvest Country Music Festival on Monday, October 2, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)
People pray during a candlelight vigil for victims of the Route 91 music festival mass shooting next to the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S. October 3, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 03: Balloons are seen near the corner of Las Vegas Blvd. and E. Reno Ave. on Tuesday October 03, 2017 in Las Vegas, NV. Suspected gunman, Stephen Paddock killed 59 people and wounded hundreds who were attending the Route 91 Harvest Festival. (Photo by Matt McClain/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 03: Las Vegas police are seen near the site of the Route 91 Harvest Festival on Tuesday October 03, 2017 in Las Vegas, NV. Suspected gunman, Stephen Paddock killed 59 people and wounded hundreds who were attending the Route 91 Harvest Festival. (Photo by Matt McClain/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 03: Las Vegas police are seen near the corner of Las Vegas Blvd. and E. Reno Ave. on Tuesday October 03, 2017 in Las Vegas, NV. Suspected gunman, Stephen Paddock killed 59 people and wounded hundreds who were attending the Route 91 Harvest Festival. (Photo by Matt McClain/The Washington Post)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 3: Spiritual leaders of various faiths and attendees gather after the Las Vegas Gun Violence Vigil in the Bishop's Garden at the Washington National Cathedral in Washington, DC on October 3, 2017. The Bourdon Bell, in the tower pictured, was rung 60 times, once for each of the victims killed and the perpetrator. "As churches we have a responsibility to promote nonviolence," Jim Winkler of the National Council of Churches said. He went on to say that he is calling upon U.S. Congress to enact common sense gun control legislation. (Photo by Carolyn Van Houten/The Washington Post)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 3: Hurunnessa Fariad, interfaith coordinator for the All Dulles Area Muslim Society, wipes away a tear as Rev. Thomas Bowen, director of the DC Mayor's Office of Religious Affairs, speaks during the Las Vegas Gun Violence Vigil in the Bishop's Garden at the Washington National Cathedral in Washington, DC on October 3, 2017. The Bourdon Bell was rung 60 times, once for each of the victims killed and the perpetrator. "As churches we have a responsibility to promote nonviolence," Jim Winkler of the National Council of Churches said. He went on to say that he is calling upon U.S. Congress to enact common sense gun control legislation. (Photo by Carolyn Van Houten/The Washington Post)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 3: Rev. Sarabeth Goodwin listens to the Bourdon Bell during the Las Vegas Gun Violence Vigil in the Bishop's Garden at the Washington National Cathedral in Washington, DC on October 3, 2017. The Bourdon Bell was rung 60 times, once for each of the victims killed and the perpetrator. "As churches we have a responsibility to promote nonviolence," Jim Winkler of the National Council of Churches said. He went on to say that he is calling upon U.S. Congress to enact common sense gun control legislation. (Photo by Carolyn Van Houten/The Washington Post)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 3: The Rt. Rev. Mariann Edgar Budde, bishop with the Episcopal Diocese of Washington, speaks during the Las Vegas Gun Violence Vigil in the Bishop's Garden at the Washington National Cathedral in Washington, DC on October 3, 2017. The Bourdon Bell was rung 60 times, once for each of the victims killed and the perpetrator. "As churches we have a responsibility to promote nonviolence," Jim Winkler of the National Council of Churches said. He went on to say that he is calling upon U.S. Congress to enact common sense gun control legislation. (Photo by Carolyn Van Houten/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 03: An American flag is seen at a makeshift memorial on Tuesday October 03, 2017 in Las Vegas, NV. Suspected gunman, Stephen Paddock killed 59 people and wounded hundreds who were attending the Route 91 Harvest Festival. (Photo by Matt McClain/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 3: Lauren Ballardini, of Las Vegas, NV, prays during a vigil at Mountain Crest Park on Tuesday, October 3, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 3: Police officers join city officers and people for a vigil at Mountain Crest Park on Tuesday, October 3, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)
Mandatory Credit: Photo by PAUL BUCK/EPA-EFE/REX/Shutterstock (9112030h) The badge of a Las Vegas Police officer in attendance during a candlelight vigil for all those affected by the mass shooting at the Route 91 Harvest Festival on Las Vegas Boulevard at Mountain Crest Park in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, 03 October 2017. Over a hundred people attended the vigil where a candle was lit for every victim of the Las Vegas shooting. Police reports indicate that a gunman, identified as Stephen Paddock, 64, firing from an upper floor in the Mandalay Bay hotel killed 58 people and injured more than 500 before he reportedly killed himself as police made their way to his hotel room. Candlelight vigil for victims of Las Vegas mass shooting, USA - 03 Oct 2017
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 3: Community leaders light up 59 candles during a vigil at Mountain Crest Park on Tuesday, October 3, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 3: Community leaders light up 59 candles during a vigil at Mountain Crest Park on Tuesday, October 3, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 3: People listen to a city official speaks during a vigil at Mountain Crest Park on Tuesday, October 3, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 3: Cindy Cusimano and Garth Courtney listen to a speaker during a vigil at Mountain Crest Park on Tuesday, October 3, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 3: People clap after a city official speaker during a vigil at Mountain Crest Park on Tuesday, October 3, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 3: Janet Marchal, of Las Vegas, NV, hugs her children, from left, Serenna Marchal, 10, Celeste Marchal, 8, and Sidonie Marchal, 6, during a vigil at Mountain Crest Park on Tuesday, October 3, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. Marchal planed to move from California with her family to Paris few years ago then the attacks occurred, so she moved to Las Vegas a year ago. "I am really proud of how this community came together during this difficult time, it really makes you feel home. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 3: Maxine Johnson, of Las Vegas, NV, prays with others during a vigil at Mountain Crest Park on Tuesday, October 3, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)
People pray during a vigil for the victims of a mass shooting at the Route 91 Harvest Country Music Festival in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 3, 2017. REUTERS/Chris Wattie
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 03: Laura Rodriguez, left, embraces her daughter, Sara Rivero as they visit a makeshift memorial on Tuesday October 03, 2017 in Las Vegas, NV. Suspected gunman, Stephen Paddock killed 59 people and wounded hundreds who were attending the Route 91 Harvest Festival. (Photo by Matt McClain/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 03: Andrea Ybarra- Rojas and her daughter, Anya Ybarra- Rojas, 7, pray at a makeshift memorial on Tuesday October 03, 2017 in Las Vegas, NV. Suspected gunman, Stephen Paddock killed 59 people and wounded hundreds who were attending the Route 91 Harvest Festival. (Photo by Matt McClain/The Washington Post)
Pastor William McCurdy holds a candle during a prayer vigil in honor of those affected by the shooting on the Las Vegas Strip, in front of Las Vegas City Hall in Las Vegas, Monday, Oct. 2, 2017. The vigil was held in honor of the over 50 people killed and hundreds injured in a mass shooting at an outdoor music concert late Sunday. (Steve Marcus/Las Vegas Sun via AP)
Las Vegas Mayor Carolyn Goodman, left, listens to Congresswoman Dina Titus, D-Nev., during a prayer vigil in honor of those affected by the shooting on the Las Vegas Strip, in front of Las Vegas City Hall in Las Vegas, Monday, Oct. 2, 2017. The vigil was held in honor of the over 50 people killed and hundreds injured in a mass shooting at an outdoor music concert late Sunday. (Steve Marcus/Las Vegas Sun via AP)
Rosa and Alan Duarte become emotional during a vigil at City Hall in Las Vegas, Monday, Oct. 2, 2017. The vigil was held in honor of the over 50 people killed and hundreds injured in a mass shooting at an outdoor music concert late Sunday. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
Mandatory Credit: Photo by EUGENE GARCIA/EPA-EFE/REX/Shutterstock (9107485e) Mourners pay tribute at a makeshift memorial on the Las Vegas Strip for the victims of a mass shooting in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, 02 October 2017. The mass shooting, which left at least 58 people dead and more than 500 injured on 01 October, is the largest in modern US history. The gunman, identified by the police as Stephen Paddock, 64, fired from an upper floor of the Mandalay Bay hotel before reportedly killing himself as police made their way into his hotel room. Makeshift memorial for the victims of the Las Vegas Strip mass shooting, USA - 02 Oct 2017
Students from University of Nevada Las Vegas hold a vigil Monday, Oct. 2, 2017, in Las Vegas. A gunman on the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay casino hotel rained automatic weapons fire down on the crowd of over 22,000 at an outdoor country music festival Sunday. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
A sign is pictured at a vigil on the Las Vegas strip following a mass shooting at the Route 91 Harvest Country Music Festival in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 2, 2017. Picture taken October 2, 2017. REUTERS/Chris Wattie
University of Nevada Las Vegas students Raymond Lloyd, right, and Karla Rodriguez take part in a vigil Monday, Oct. 2, 2017, in Las Vegas. A gunman on the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay casino hotel rained automatic weapons fire down on the crowd of over 22,000 at an outdoor country music festival Sunday. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
Mandatory Credit: Photo by EUGENE GARCIA/EPA-EFE/REX/Shutterstock (9107485b) A sign at the W hotel on the Las Vegas Strip pays tribute to the victims of a mass shooting in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, 02 October 2017. The mass shooting, which left at least 58 people dead and more than 500 injured on 01 October, is the largest in modern US history. The gunman, identified by the police as Stephen Paddock, 64, fired from an upper floor of the Mandalay Bay hotel before reportedly killing himself as police made their way into his hotel room. Makeshift memorial for the victims of the Las Vegas Strip mass shooting, USA - 02 Oct 2017
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 2: People make their way to the candlelight service at Canyon Ridge Christian Church a day after at least 59 people were killed and more than 500 wounded at the Route 91 Harvest Country Music Festival on Monday, October 2, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 2: Church volunteer John Allen, 59, hands out candles ahead of a candlelight service at Canyon Ridge Christian Church a day after at least 59 people were killed and more than 500 wounded at the Route 91 Harvest Country Music Festival on Monday, October 2, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 2: Hundreds of people pray during a candlelight service at Canyon Ridge Christian Church a day after at least 59 people were killed and more than 500 wounded at the Route 91 Harvest Country Music Festival on Monday, October 2, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 2: Hundreds of people pray during a candlelight service at Canyon Ridge Christian Church a day after at least 59 people were killed and more than 500 wounded at the Route 91 Harvest Country Music Festival on Monday, October 2, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 2: Hundreds of people pray during a candlelight service at Canyon Ridge Christian Church a day after at least 59 people were killed and more than 500 wounded at the Route 91 Harvest Country Music Festival on Monday, October 2, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 2: A woman prays during a candlelight service at Canyon Ridge Christian Church a day after at least 59 people were killed and more than 500 wounded at the Route 91 Harvest Country Music Festival on Monday, October 2, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)
Photo Gallery: People held vigils and services for the victims of the attack that killed at least 58 and injured hundreds.

William Wan is a national correspondent for The Washington Post, covering science and news. He previously served as the paper’s religion reporter, foreign policy correspondent and for three years as the Post’s China correspondent in Beijing.

Sandhya Somashekhar is the social change reporter for the Washington Post.

Marwa Eltagouri is a general assignment reporter for The Washington Post. She previously worked as a reporter for the Chicago Tribune, where she covered crime, immigration and neighborhood change. Contact her at marwa.eltagouri@washpost.com.

Post Recommends
Outbrain

You obviously love great journalism.

With special savings on our Basic Digital package, you’ll never miss a single story again.

Already a subscriber?

Secure & Encrypted