Democracy Dies in Darkness

Letters to the Editor | Opinion

Pedestrians often don’t get to present their side of an accident story

September 9, 2018 at 7:27 PM

Police investigate an accident in Northwest Washington in 2013 in which several pedestrians were injured. (Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post)

Pedestrian fatalities are rising in the Washington area and across the United States, according to the Sept. 4 Metro article “4 pedestrians fatally struck over holiday weekend.” Most such deaths are attributed to what police often term “pedestrian error,” such as walking in a traffic lane or outside a crosswalk.

I’m curious: How does a dead pedestrian present his or her side of the story?

Don DeArmon, Frederick

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Letters to the Editor | Opinion

Pedestrians often don’t get to present their side of an accident story

September 9, 2018 at 7:27 PM

Police investigate an accident in Northwest Washington in 2013 in which several pedestrians were injured. (Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post)

Pedestrian fatalities are rising in the Washington area and across the United States, according to the Sept. 4 Metro article “4 pedestrians fatally struck over holiday weekend.” Most such deaths are attributed to what police often term “pedestrian error,” such as walking in a traffic lane or outside a crosswalk.

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