Democracy Dies in Darkness

PostEverything | Perspective

The Clinton campaign warned you about Russia. But nobody listened to us.

Democrats can still fight back now. Here's how.

By Jennifer Palmieri

March 24, 2017 at 1:40 PM

At the Democratic convention in Philadelphia last summer, Jake Sullivan and I took to our golf carts one afternoon to make the rounds of the television networks' tents in the parking lot of the Wells Fargo Center. It is standard for presidential campaign staffers to brief networks on what to expect during that night's session. But on this day, we were on a mission to get the press to focus on something even we found difficult to process: the prospect that Russia had not only hacked and stolen emails from the Democratic National Committee, but that it had done so to help Donald Trump and hurt Hillary Clinton.

Sullivan was Clinton's policy adviser. He had been Vice President Joe Biden's national security adviser, a deputy to then-Secretary Clinton at the State Department and a lead negotiator of the Obama administration's nuclear deal with Iran. He is a widely respected national security expert and, as he does every day, he spoke carefully, without hyperbole. All we had to go on then was what had been reported by the press. We weren't sure if Russia was doing this to undermine Americans' faith in our political process or if it was trying to make Trump the next president. But we wanted to raise the alarm.

We did not succeed. Reporters were focused on the many daily distractions, the horse race, the stories they were doing based on the stolen DNC emails and the many other Trump scandals that were easier to explain. Voters didn't seem worried. Earlier that week, our campaign manager, Robby Mook, was mocked for telling CNN that the leak of stolen emails before our convention was an indication that Russia was trying to help Trump. We did not know, as FBI Director James B. Comey told Congress this past week, that the bureau had already opened an investigation into Russian interference — and into possible links between Trump's associates and the Russian government, including whether they worked together on his behalf. At the time, it seemed far-fetched that Russia would meddle so openly, and reporters and voters alike seemed convinced that it didn't matter anyway, because Clinton was going to win.

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FBI Director James B. Comey confirms the Bureau is investigating Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election and possible collusion between Kremlin and Trump associates during a House Intelligence Committee hearing March 20. (Reuters)

Related: [Congress can’t resolve the questions about Trump and Russia on its own]

Now that Trump is president, though, the stakes are higher, because the Russian plot succeeded. The lessons we campaign officials learned in trying to turn the Russia story against Trump can help other Democrats  (and all Americans) figure out how to treat this interference no longer as a matter of electoral politics but as the threat to the republic that it really is.

* * *

For me, Comey's disclosure on Monday brought nearly unfathomable frustration. I will never understand why he would send a letter to Congress 11 days before the election to let lawmakers know that the FBI had happened upon more emails — which they didn't yet know the contents of — that may or may not have been relevant to Clinton, but he did not think the public should know that federal agents were also investigating Trump's campaign.

Without anyone knowing about the FBI's interest, it was difficult to bring appropriate attention to the Russia issue and Trump's curious pro-Putin bent. The week after the convention, we sought out credible national security voices to sound alarms. I was surprised by the enthusiasm with which some, such as former acting CIA director Michael Morell, jumped into the fray. When I worked in the Obama White House, people in national security positions had been uneasy making broad public arguments, particularly about political matters. Not this time. They were so concerned about the situation that, to me, the language they used to describe the threat they believed Russia and Trump posed was shocking. I remember my jaw dropping as I sat in our Brooklyn campaign headquarters and read the op-ed Morell submitted to the New York Times in early August, in which he shared his view that Russia had probably undertaken an effort to "recruit" Trump and that the Republican nominee had become an "unwitting agent of the Russian Federation."

But the sheer spectacle of Trump kept the Russia allegations from getting the attention they would have had with any previous candidate. His unconventional campaign had so disrupted the press-political ecosystem that no one could fathom or absorb that — in addition to all the drama they saw on stage — Russia may have been conspiring with Trump or his allies behind the scenes to win the election for him. Compared with the lawsuits women were filing against Trump for alleged assault or his 3 a.m. tweets attacking a former Miss Universe, the details of who hacked whom seemed less interesting and more complicated. And because nearly everyone was sure that Clinton would win, and that she therefore needed more watchdogging, reporters and analysts were faster to jump on the latest batch of stolen emails or announcement from Comey.

We sought moments for Clinton and Tim Kaine, her running mate, to talk about Russia when we knew they would be on live television and couldn't be edited. The debates offered the best opportunity, and Clinton took advantage, culminating with her famous line calling Trump Putin's "puppet " in the third one. It was tough deciding how much of her time to devote to the issue. We were in a Catch-22: We didn't want her to talk too much about Russia because it wasn't what voters were telling us they cared about — and, frankly, it sounded kind of wacky. At the same time, we understood the issue would never rise to the front of voters' minds if we weren't driving attention to it. It was already pretty clear they weren't going to hear much about it in the press.

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At the third and final presidential debate, Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton said Russian President Vladimir Putin would "rather have a puppet as president." (The Washington Post)

On Oct. 7, I thought the Russia story would finally break through. We were at a debate prep session in Westchester County, N.Y., when the director of national intelligence and the secretary of homeland security put out a joint statement saying that the U.S. intelligence community was "confident" that not only had the Russian government hacked Democrats' emails, but "Russia's senior-most officials" were probably directing their release to influence the election. Incredible. Finally, here was the break we had been waiting for. I was on a conference call with my colleagues to discuss our response when someone said: "Hey, Palmieri. There's an 'Access Hollywood' video that just got released." Literally minutes later, WikiLeaks put out the first batch of John Podesta's stolen Gmail. And that was that. The rest is history.

* * *

All of us — the press, Congress, the public, the administration — are still guilty of the soft complicity of low expectations. As president, Trump does and says outrageous and false things every week, from ordering arbitrary travel bans to accusing President Obama of illegal wiretapping with no evidence. The Russia charges blend in, making it all too easy to treat them as just the latest thing the president has blustered his way through. I understand how difficult it is to put the threat in the right context. We trod lightly at times during the campaign because it sounded too fantastic to be credible, too complicated to absorb.

In another era, Americans would have been able to count on both Democrats and Republicans in Congress to stand up to this kind of threat. A lot of Democrats like to play the "If we were Republicans" game. I usually hate it; I don't want to behave like the Republicans do. But it's useful here. If Clinton had won with the help of the Russians, the Republicans would have impeachment proceedings underway for treason. No doubt. Instead, dealing with Russia falls nearly solely on Democrats' shoulders.

But Democrats can break out of the Catch-22 of the campaign: If we make plain that what Russia has done is nothing less than an attack on our republic, the public will be with us. And the more we talk about it, the more they'll be with us. Polls show that voters are now concerned about the Russia story and overwhelmingly support an independent, bipartisan commission to take over this investigation. Members of Congress should use every procedural tool available to force votes on such a commission. Don't let business continue on Capitol Hill without insisting at every opportunity that our nation should resolve the Russia matter. Filibustering Neil Gorsuch is a good start. Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer is right that it would be "unseemly" to move forward with a lifetime appointment to the Supreme Court by a president whose campaign is under an active FBI investigation.

Democrats should push for this relentlessly and above all else. They should talk about it in every interview. They should invoke the "big gray cloud " that Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Calif.), the House Intelligence Committee chairman, said hangs over the Trump administration — so often that anchors sigh and roll their eyes when they say it. They should call out the Republicans in Congress who seek to distract from the substance of the Russia investigation by arguing that leaks are the real problem. Democrats should be blunt: These apologists are complicit in helping Russia undermine our democracy. So far, the GOP has seen defending Trump as being in their political interests. But now we're at a tipping point. If those Republicans feel enough heat for helping Vladi­mir Putin attack the United States to assist Trump, they will abandon the White House and support an independent commission.

Related: [How Trump got his party to love Russia]

The possibility of collusion between Trump's allies and Russian intelligence is much more serious than Watergate. It is a constitutional crisis. It represents a violation of our republic's most sacred trust.

The worst part about our lackluster collective response to Russia's interference is that it represents exactly what the Russians were hoping to produce: apathy. Their goal, in addition to installing a president sympathetic to their views, was to undermine Americans' belief in our democracy. For Americans to think that none of this really matters, that it's all a game. That's how they truly erode U.S. moral authority and strength over the long term. It's what they have sought to do to European adversaries for many years, and now they have brought this seed of destruction here.

We all have a role to play in stopping it. Each of us should be judged by how we respond at this moment when the most fundamental precept of our democracy has been violated.

Read more:

Our campaign lost the election. But Trump's team must own up to how he won.

Donald Trump is normalizing paranoia and conspiracy thinking in American politics

How Russian "kompromat" destroys political opponents, no facts required


Jennifer Palmieri was communications director for Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign.

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