Ever wonder what that “fair trade” or other symbol on your chocolate candy means? Not as much as you might think. Kerstin Lindgren at Fair World Project, an organization that monitors fair-trade organizations, helped us decipher the requirements behind four seals commonly found on chocolate in the United States. We also asked spokespersons from each organization to describe what the seals mean. (For the purposes of this graphic, we focused on four ingredients often found in chocolate that we know can be certified: cocoa, cocoa butter, sugar and vanilla.)

FAIR TRADE USA

20%

of total ingredients must

be made up of certified

ingredients; only chocolate

must be certified (though

vanilla and sugar may be

certified).

“The Fair Trade Certified seal

indicates that your goods

were produced according

to rigorous social and

environmental standards,

and that farmers earned

additional money for

community development with

every sale.”

FAIR FOR LIFE

50%

of total ingredients

must be made up of

certified products; all

four ingredients must be

certified.

“Fair for Life promotes

an approach of fair trade

that allows producers

and workers who are at a

particular disadvantage — no

matter the country where

they work — to access a

wider range of social and

economic benefits.”

FAIRTRADE

INTERNATIONAL/AMERICA

20%

of total ingredients must

be made up of certified

products; all four ingredients

must be certified.

“Fairtrade is a simple way to

support the people growing

the products we love as

they build a better future for

themselves, their families

and their communities.

Products carrying the

Fairtrade mark meet the

rigorous social, economic

and environmental fair-trade

standards.”

RAINFOREST ALLIANCE*

30%

of total cocoa (not total

ingredients) must be certified;

for example, if 60 percent of

the bar is cocoa; 30 percent

of that must be certified.

“The Rainforest Alliance

green frog certification seal

indicates that a cocoa farm

has been audited to meet

strict standards that require

environmental, social and

economic sustainability.”

*NOT CONSIDERED

A FAIR-TRADE CERTIFICATION

Correction: A graphic about fair-trade chocolate in the April 16 Magazine should not have included a photo of several unwrapped and identifiable chocolate bars without explaining which fair-trade organization certifies each product. The photo included a chocolate bar produced by Theo Chocolate, which noted that all of its products exceed the 50 percent requirement of the Fair for Life certification and that the majority of its products use 100 percent Fair for Life ingredients.

Ever wonder what that “fair trade” or other symbol on your chocolate candy means? Not as much as you might think. Kerstin Lindgren at Fair World Project, an organization that monitors fair-trade organizations, helped us decipher the requirements behind four seals commonly found on chocolate in the United States. We also asked spokespersons from each organization to describe what the seals mean. (For the purposes of this graphic, we focused on four ingredients often found in chocolate that we know can be certified: cocoa, cocoa butter, sugar and vanilla.)

FAIRTRADE

RAINFOREST ALLIANCE*

FAIR TRADE USA

FAIR FOR LIFE

INTERNATIONAL/AMERICA

20%

50%

20%

30%

of total ingredients must

of total ingredients

of total ingredients must

of total cocoa (not total

be made up of certified

must be made up of

be made up of certified

ingredients) must be certified;

ingredients; only chocolate

certified products; all

products; all four ingredients

for example, if 60 percent of

must be certified (though

four ingredients must be

must be certified.

the bar is cocoa; 30 percent

vanilla and sugar may be

certified.

of that must be certified.

certified).

“Fairtrade is a simple way to

“Fair for Life promotes

support the people growing

“The Rainforest Alliance

an approach of fair trade

the products we love as

green frog certification seal

“The Fair Trade Certified seal

indicates that your goods

that allows producers

they build a better future for

indicates that a cocoa farm

were produced according

and workers who are at a

themselves, their families

has been audited to meet

to rigorous social and

particular disadvantage — no

and their communities.

strict standards that require

environmental standards,

matter the country where

Products carrying the

environmental, social and

and that farmers earned

they work — to access a

Fairtrade mark meet the

economic sustainability.”

additional money for

wider range of social and

rigorous social, economic

*NOT CONSIDERED

community development with

economic benefits.”

and environmental fair-trade

A FAIR-TRADE CERTIFICATION

every sale.”

standards.”

Correction: A graphic about fair-trade chocolate in the April 16 Magazine should not have included a photo of several unwrapped and identifiable chocolate bars without explaining which fair-trade organization certifies each product. The photo included a chocolate bar produced by Theo Chocolate, which noted that all of its products exceed the 50 percent requirement of the Fair for Life certification and that the majority of its products use 100 percent Fair for Life ingredients.