At 7:55 a.m. on Dec. 7, 1941, Japanese dive–bombers, fighter–bombers and torpedo planes attacked the American naval base at Pearl Harbor near Honolulu. The attack lasted less than two hours. About 360 Japanese planes took part in the attack.

Pearl Harbor

Hickam

Field

Pearl Harbor

Mamala

Bay

Aiea

Bay

East Loch

Pearl Harbor

Southeast Loch

WAIPIO

THE IMMEDIATE TOLL

The Marine Corps suffered 178 casualties,

of which 109 were deaths and 69 wounded.

 

The Navy suffered 2,718 casualtiesn

of which 2,008 were deaths and 710

wounded.

 

The Army suffered 341 casualties, of which 228 were deaths and 113 wounded.

 

In addition, at least 57 civilians were killed, and nearly as many were seriously injured.

 

The Japanese sank or severely damaged 18 U.S. ships (some not shown here), including eight battleships, three light cruisers and three destroyers. On the airfields, the Japanese destroyed 161 American planes and seriously damaged 102.

 

The Japanese lost 29 planes and 55 airmen during the attack. The Japanese carrier task force sailed away undetected and unscathed.

USS OKLAHOMA GETS HIT

DETAIL

Nine torpedoes are estimated to have struck the battleship.

9

7

8

5

6

3

4

2

1

Torpedo strike locations

When the first warning of the attack was sounded, sailors onboard the USS Oklahoma took to the antiaircraft batteries, and the ship went to general quarters. Shortly after the attack on Pearl Harbor began, torpedoes were seen approaching the USS Oklahoma.

One portside machine gun opened fire but the force of the explosion and the oil and water thrown up by the first torpedo stopped it. Because of the rapid heeling of the ship and the oil and water on the decks, it was impossible to fire the guns effectively.

TORPEDO STRIKES AND SINKING

7:56 a.m.

The ship was struck by three torpedoes on the port side at about 7:56 a.m.

3

2

1

Torpedo strike locations

8:00 a.m.

The ship immediately began to list to port.

8

7

6

5

4

Torpedo strike locations

Further torpedoes struck the Oklahoma’s side at higher levels as the ship listed.

8:06 a.m.

9

Torpedo strike location

It finally rolled over completely about 8:08 a.m., a mere 12 minutes after the attack began.

8:08 a.m.

The speed of the rollover left hundreds of men trapped inside. Once the attack was over, salvage operations began and continued for as long as hope remained. Thirty-two men were rescued from the partially sunken vessel.

INITIAL TOLL

A U.S. Navy report of the attack, dated

Dec. 15, 1941, offered this summary of the dead, wounded and missing from the USS Oklahoma.

Officers

Crew

Total

Wounded

2

24

26

Dead

0

22

22

Missing

21

385

406

RECOVERY

Of the missing, 35 crew members were positively identified and buried in the years immediately after the attack. The Oklahoma was eventually righted and refloated in 1943 after more than a year of engineering work. It was sold to a scrapping firm after the war but sank in a storm while under tow from Hawaii in May 1947. In 1950, the unidentified remains of close to 400 men were laid to rest at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Hawaii.

At 7:55 a.m. on Dec. 7, 1941, Japanese dive–bombers, fighter–bombers and torpedo planes attacked the American naval base at Pearl Harbor near Honolulu. The attack lasted less than two hours. About 360 Japanese planes took part in the attack.

WAIMALU

East Loch

Aiea

Bay

Pearl Harbor

Middle

Loch

Pearl Harbor

Halawa

Stream

USS Arizona

Ford Island

Naval Air Station

USS Oklahoma

Submarine

base

Southeast

Loch

WAIPIO

PEARL HARBOR DAMAGE

West

Loch

No damage

Severely damaged

Some damage

Sunk or beached

THE IMMEDIATE TOLL

The Marine Corps suffered 178 casualties, of which 109 were deaths and 69 wounded.

 

The Navy suffered 2,718 casualties, of which 2,008 were deaths and 710 wounded.

 

The Army suffered 341 casualties, of which 228 were deaths and 113 wounded.

 

In addition, at least 57 civilians were killed, and nearly as many were seriously injured.

The Japanese sank or severely damaged 18 U.S. ships (some not shown here), including eight battleships, three light cruisers and three destroyers. On the airfields, the Japanese destroyed 161 American planes and seriously damaged 102.

 

The Japanese lost 29 planes and 55 airmen during the attack. The Japanese carrier task force sailed away undetected and unscathed.

USS OKLAHOMA

GETS HIT

DETAIL

One portside machine gun opened fire but the force of the explosion and the oil and water thrown up by the first torpedo stopped it. Because of the rapid heeling of the ship and the oil and water on the decks, it was impossible to fire the guns effectively.

When the first warning of the attack was sounded, sailors onboard the USS Oklahoma took to the antiaircraft batteries, and the ship went to general quarters. Shortly after the attack on Pearl Harbor began, torpedoes were seen approaching the USS Oklahoma.

 

TORPEDO STRIKES

Further torpedoes struck the Oklahoma’s side at higher levels as the ship listed. It finally rolled over completely about 8:08 a.m., a mere 12 minutes after the attack began.

The ship was struck by three torpedoes on the port side at about 7:56 a.m. The ship immediately began to list to port.

9

7

8

5

6

3

4

2

1

Torpedo strike locations

THE SINKING

7:56 a.m.

8:00 a.m.

Nine torpedoes are estimated to have struck the battleship.

8

3

7

6

5

4

2

1

Torpedo strike locations

8:06 a.m.

8:08 a.m.

The speed of the rollover left hundreds of men trapped inside. Once the attack was over, salvage operations began and continued for as long as hope remained. Thirty-two men were rescued from the partially sunken vessel.

9

Torpedo strike location

INITIAL TOLL

Officers

Crew

Total

A U.S. Navy report of the attack, dated Dec. 15, 1941, offered this summary of the dead, wounded and missing from the USS Oklahoma.

Wounded

2

24

26

Dead

0

22

22

Missing

21

385

406

RECOVERY

Of the missing, 35 crew members were positively identified and buried in the years immediately after the attack. The Oklahoma was eventually righted and refloated in 1943 after more than a year of engineering work. It was sold to a scrapping firm after the war but sank in a storm while under tow from Hawaii in May 1947. In 1950, the unidentified remains of close to 400 men were laid to rest at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Hawaii.

At 7:55 a.m. on Dec. 7, 1941, Japanese dive–bombers, fighter–bombers and torpedo planes attacked the American naval base at Pearl Harbor near Honolulu. The attack lasted less than two hours. Approximately 360 Japanese planes took part in the attack.

Pearl Harbor

THE IMMEDIATE TOLL

WAIMALU

The Japanese sank or severely damaged 18 U.S. ships (some not shown here), including eight battleships, three light cruisers and three destroyers. On the airfields, the Japanese destroyed 161 American planes and seriously damaged 102.

 

The Marine Corps suffered 178 casualties. of which 109 were deaths and 69 wounded.

 

The Navy suffered 2,718 casualties, of which 2,008 were deaths and 710 wounded.

 

The Army suffered 341 casualties, of which 228 were deaths and 113 seriously wounded.

 

In addition, at least 57 civilians were killed, and nearly as many were seriously injured.

 

The Japanese lost 29 planes and 55 airmen during the attack. The Japanese carrier task force sailed away undetected and unscathed.

East Loch

Hickam

Field

Aiea

Bay

Mamala Bay

Pearl Harbor

Middle Loch

Halawa

Stream

USS Arizona

Ford Island

Naval Air Station

USS Oklahoma

WAIPIO

Submarine

base

Southeast

Loch

West Loch

PEARL HARBOR DAMAGE

No damage

Severely damaged

Some damage

Sunk or beached

USS OKLAHOMA GETS HIT

When the first warning of the attack was sounded, sailors onboard the USS Oklahoma took to the antiaircraft batteries, and the ship went to general quarters. Shortly after the attack on Pearl Harbor began, torpedoes were seen approaching the USS Oklahoma.

One portside machine gun opened fire but the force of the explosion and the oil and water thrown up by the first torpedo stopped it. Because of the rapid heeling of the ship and the oil and water on the decks, it was impossible to fire the guns effectively.

9

7

8

5

6

3

4

2

1

THE SINKING

The ship was struck by three torpedoes on the port side at about 7:56 a.m. The ship immediately began to list to port.

Further torpedoes struck the Oklahoma’s side at higher levels as the ship listed. Nine torpedoes are estimated to have struck the battleship.

It finally rolled over completely about 8:08 a.m., a mere 12 minutes after the attack began.

 

The speed of the rollover left hundreds of men trapped inside. Once the attack was over, salvage operations began and continued for as long as hope remained. Thirty-two men were rescued from the partially sunken vessel.

8

3

7

6

5

9

4

2

1

7:56 a.m.

8:00 a.m.

8:06 a.m.

8:08 a.m.

INITIAL TOLL

RECOVERY

A U.S. Navy report of the attack, dated Dec. 15, 1941, offered this

summary of the dead, wounded and missing from the USS Oklahoma.

Of the missing, 35 crew members were positively identified and buried in the years immediately after the attack. The Oklahoma was eventually righted and refloated in 1943 after more than a year of engineering work. It was sold to a scrapping firm after the war but sank in a storm while under tow from Hawaii in May 1947. In 1950, the unidentified remains of close to 400 men were laid to rest at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Hawaii.

Officers

Crew

Total

Wounded

2

24

26

Dead

0

22

22

Missing

21

385

406

SOURCE: "Salvage of the Battleship USS Oklahoma," by F. H. Whittacker, U.S. Navy, World War II Database, Naval History and Heritage Command, and Oklahoma Historical Society. Published Dec. 4, 2015.