Jerry Jones

Dallas

THE INNER

CIRCLE

Robert Kraft

New England

Jerry Richardson

Carolina

Five NFL team owners helped groom Goodell and, in 2006, were influential in electing him commissioner. Hands-on and interested in all aspects of the league’s direction, these owners are loyal — and expect loyalty in return. These owners, one team executive said, are the ones “Roger uses to run the league.”

One of the two most powerful NFL owners, along with Kraft, Jones is a formidable Goodell ally — as long as the commissioner is running the league the way Jones wants it.

DeflateGate has driven a wedge between the pair, but Kraft sees Goodell like a son and enjoys having a hand in running the league; those who know both men predict the rift will be brief.

After receding in recent years because of health problems and his son’s death, Richardson is seen as the ultimate company man.

Art Rooney,

Pittsburgh

Dan Rooney

Pittsburgh.

John Mara

New York Giants

Along with the Maras, the Rooneys represent what amounts to a royal family in the NFL.

More active in league politics than Steve Tisch, who along with Mara owns 50 percent of the Giants, the Mara family puts the league and its traditions first.

The

Loyalists

Robert McNair

Houston

Arthur Blank

Atlanta

Chairman of the NFL’s finance committee, McNair is viewed as one of the most influential franchise owners — just on the outside of the innermost circle.

As audit and

compensation

committee chairman, Blank sets the commissioner’s pay — a combined $79 million in 2012 and 2013.

Jeffrey Lurie

Philadelphia

 

Steve Bisciotti

Baltimore

Clark Hunt

Kansas City

Movers and shakers throughout the league, these franchise owners are progressive and honest, some heading committees. This group is more likely to challenge the commissioner or league office.

 

A voice of reason during collective-bargaining agreement discussions in 2011, Hunt is a thoughtful and no-nonsense tactician.

Bisciotti is considered highly influential in league politics — but not necessarily in lockstep with the commissioner.

The Eagles owner has served on various league committees and is seen as a progressive thinker.

Shad Khan

Jacksonville

Jed York

San Francisco

Stan Kroenke

St. Louis

A real estate magnate, Kroenke could become one of the most powerful NFL owners if the Rams move to Los Angeles.

The NFL’s youngest owner shrewdly oversaw the 49ers’s move to Santa Clara — closer to Silicon Valley than the Bay Area.

Still a relatively new owner, having bought the Jaguars in 2011, Khan is seen as an important envoy to expanding the NFL internationally.

Alex Spanos

San Diego

Dean Spanos

San Diego

Paul Allen

Seattle

Jim Irsay

Indianapolis

Has in recent years taken a greater role in league matters, but personal problems have largely kept Irsay on the fringe.

A predictable vote Goodell can always count on; however, the Chargers’ owners are not seen as movers and shakers.

The Microsoft co-founder is seen as a wealthy, creative figure, but Allen rarely attends owners meetings or league functions.

These owners, for one reason or another, don’t have the same level of influence as others. A few once wielded power before age or health problems took their tolls; others are seen as up-and-comers who could be leaned on

more heavily.

Tom Benson

New Orleans

Pat Bowlen

Denver

Bidwill family

Arizona

Owner Bill Bidwill has mostly stayed out of league matters, but son Michael — the team’s president — is hands-on and progressive.

Once among the NFL’s most powerful owners, the 88-year-old Saints’ owner’s health is waning and he no longer wields the influence he once did.

Before health problems caused by Alzheimer’s disease, Bowlen was among the league’s most powerful men – and among the strongest Goodell loyalists.

Terry Pegula

Buffalo

Still less than a year since he assumed control of the Bills, Pegula’s power and desire to be involved in league politics aren’t yet known.

Disengaged or defiant, these owners are seen as prominent individuals the league office must manage — and keep happy — but for a variety of reasons are not involved in shaping NFL policy.

Woody Johnson

New York Jets

Mike Brown

Cincinnati

Stephen Ross

Miami

His $6.5 billion net worth and ability to assist the league on investments and acquisitions make him a strong potential ally.

Brown is an occasional critic of the league and is known to stand up for himself — occasionally to the league’s frustration.

He owns a team in New York, the country’s largest media market, but other than that Johnson is not seen as a relevant voice.

McCaskey family,

Chicago

Zygi Wilf

Minnesota

Ford family

Detroit

Running the Lions is a side business; the family devotes the majority of its time to running Ford Motor Company.

He works with the league on some matters, but he is not closely involved in the inner workings of the NFL.

The league seems interested in the market, moving the NFL draft to Chicago, but the McCaskeys are mostly uninvolved.

Glazer family

Tampa Bay

Jimmy Haslam

Cleveland

Dan Snyder

Washington

Has shown little to no interest in league politics.

Seen as a bully and antagonist, Snyder is not considered a meaningful figure in NFL politics.

A criminal investigation involving Haslam’s Pilot Flying J truck stop business has kept the Browns owner at a distance.

Carol and

Mark Davis

Oakland

Kenneth

Adams IV

Tennessee

Kenneth Adams IV, the late team founder’s grandson, is the only member of the franchise’s five-person ownership group to even have a hand in team matters.

Perhaps the least relevant NFL owners; this could change if the franchise moves to Los Angeles.

Note: The Green Bay Packers are the NFL’s only publicly owned company, and Mark Murphy, the team’s president, and chief executive, often represents the franchise at league gatherings.

THE INNER CIRCLE

Five NFL team owners helped groom Goodell and, in 2006, were influential in electing him commissioner. Hands-on and interested in all aspects of the league’s direction, these owners are loyal — and expect loyalty in return. These owners, one team executive said, are the ones “Roger uses to run the league.”

One of the two most powerful NFL owners, along with Kraft, Jones is a formidable Goodell ally — as long as the commissioner is running the league the way Jones wants it.

Jerry Jones

Dallas

DeflateGate has driven a wedge between the pair, but Kraft sees Goodell like a son and enjoys having a hand in running the league; those who know both men predict the rift will be brief.

Robert Kraft

New England

After receding in recent years because of health problems and his son’s death, Richardson is seen as the ultimate company man.

Jerry Richardson

Carolina

More active in league politics than Steve Tisch, who along with Mara owns 50 percent of the Giants, the Mara family puts the league and its traditions first.

John Mara

New York Giants

Along with the Maras, the Rooneys represent what amounts to a royal family in the NFL.

Art and Dan Rooney

Pittsburgh

The Loyalists

Chairman of the NFL’s finance committee, McNair is viewed as one of the most influential franchise owners — just on the outside of the innermost circle.

Robert McNair

Houston

As audit and

compensation

committee chairman, Blank sets the commissioner’s pay — a combined $79 million in 2012 and 2013.

Arthur Blank

Atlanta

Movers and shakers throughout the league, these franchise owners are progressive and honest, some heading committees. This group is more likely to challenge the commissioner or league office.

 

Bisciotti is considered highly influential in league politics — but not necessarily in lockstep with the commissioner.

Steve Bisciotti

Baltimore

A voice of reason during collective-bargaining agreement discussions in 2011, Hunt is a thoughtful and no-nonsense tactician.

Clark Hunt

Kansas City

The Eagles owner has served on various league committees and is seen as a progressive thinker.

Jeffrey Lurie

Philadelphia

 

The NFL’s youngest owner shrewdly oversaw the 49ers’s move to Santa Clara — closer to Silicon Valley than the Bay Area.

Jed York

San Francisco

A real estate magnate, Kroenke could become one of the most powerful NFL owners if the Rams move to Los Angeles.

Stan Kroenke

St. Louis

Still a relatively new owner, having bought the Jaguars in 2011, Khan is seen as an important envoy to expanding the NFL internationally.

Shad Khan

Jacksonville

These owners, for one reason or another, don’t have the same level of influence as others. A few once wielded power before age or health problems took their tolls; others are seen as up-and-comers who could be leaned on

more heavily.

Alex Spanos

San Diego

Dean Spanos

San Diego

A predictable vote Goodell can always count on; however, the Chargers’ owners are not seen as movers and shakers.

The Microsoft co-founder is seen as a wealthy, creative figure, but Allen rarely attends owners meetings or league functions.

Paul Allen

Seattle

Has in recent years taken a greater role in league matters, but personal problems have largely kept Irsay on the fringe.

Jim Irsay

Indianapolis

Owner Bill Bidwill has mostly stayed out of league matters, but son Michael — the team’s president — is hands-on and progressive.

Bidwill family

Arizona

Once among the NFL’s most powerful owners, the 88-year-old Saints’ owner’s health is waning and he no longer wields the influence he once did.

Tom Benson

New Orleans

Before health problems caused by Alzheimer’s disease, Bowlen was among the league’s most powerful men – and among the strongest Goodell loyalists.

Pat Bowlen

Denver

Still less than a year since he assumed control of the Bills, Pegula’s power and desire to be involved in league politics aren’t yet known.

Terry Pegula

Buffalo

Disengaged or defiant, these owners are seen as prominent individuals the league office must manage — and keep happy — but for a variety of reasons are not involved in shaping NFL policy.

His $6.5 billion net worth and ability to assist the league on investments and acquisitions make him a strong potential ally.

Stephen Ross

Miami

Brown is an occasional critic of the league and is known to stand up for himself — occasionally to the league’s frustration.

Mike Brown

Cincinnati

He owns a team in New York, the country’s largest media market, but other than that Johnson is not seen as a relevant voice.

Woody Johnson

New York Jets

The league seems interested in the market, moving the NFL draft to Chicago, but the McCaskeys are mostly uninvolved.

McCaskey family,

Chicago

Running the Lions is a side business; the family devotes the majority of its time to running Ford Motor Company.

Ford family

Detroit

He works with the league on some matters, but he is not closely involved in the inner workings of the NFL.

Zygi Wilf

Minnesota

A criminal investigation involving Haslam’s Pilot Flying J truck stop business has kept the Browns owner at a distance.

Jimmy Haslam

Cleveland

Seen as a bully and antagonist, Snyder is not considered a meaningful figure in NFL politics.

Dan Snyder

Washington

Has shown little to no interest in league politics.

Glazer family

Tampa Bay

Kenneth Adams IV, the late team founder’s grandson, is the only member of the franchise’s five-person ownership group to even have a hand in team matters.

Kenneth

Adams IV

Tennessee

Perhaps the least relevant NFL owners; this could change if the franchise moves to Los Angeles.

Carol and

Mark Davis

Oakland

Note: The Green Bay Packers are the NFL’s only publicly owned company, and Mark Murphy, the team’s president, and chief executive, often represents the franchise at league gatherings.

THE INNER CIRCLE

Five NFL team owners helped groom Goodell and, in 2006, were influential in electing him commissioner. Hands-on and interested in all aspects of the league’s direction, these owners are loyal — and expect loyalty in return. These owners, one team executive said, are the ones “Roger uses to run the league.”

Jerry Jones

Dallas

Robert Kraft

New England

Jerry Richardson

Carolina

One of the two most powerful NFL owners, along with Kraft, Jones is a formidable Goodell ally — as long as the commissioner is running the league the way Jones wants it.

DeflateGate has driven a wedge between the pair, but Kraft sees Goodell like a son and enjoys having a hand in running the league; those who know both men predict the rift will be brief.

After receding in recent years because of health problems and his son’s death, Richardson is seen as the ultimate company man.

Art Rooney,

Pittsburgh

Dan Rooney

Pittsburgh.

John Mara

New York Giants

Along with the Maras, the Rooneys represent what amounts to a royal family in the NFL.

More active in league politics than Steve Tisch, who along with Mara owns 50 percent of the Giants, the Mara family puts the league and its traditions first.

The Loyalists

Robert McNair

Houston

Arthur Blank

Atlanta

As audit and

compensation

committee chairman, Blank sets the commissioner’s pay — a combined $79 million in 2012 and 2013.

Chairman of the NFL’s finance committee, McNair is viewed as one of the most influential franchise owners — just on the outside of the innermost circle.

Movers and shakers throughout the league, these franchise owners are progressive and honest, some heading committees. This group is more likely to challenge the commissioner or league office.

 

Jeffrey Lurie

Philadelphia

 

Steve Bisciotti

Baltimore

Clark Hunt

Kansas City

A voice of reason during collective-bargaining agreement discussions in 2011, Hunt is a thoughtful and no-nonsense tactician.

Bisciotti is considered highly influential in league politics — but not necessarily in lockstep with the commissioner.

The Eagles owner has served on various league committees and is seen as a progressive thinker.

Shad Khan

Jacksonville

Jed York

San Francisco

Stan Kroenke

St. Louis

A real estate magnate, Kroenke could become one of the most powerful NFL owners if the Rams move to Los Angeles.

The NFL’s youngest owner shrewdly oversaw the 49ers’s move to Santa Clara — closer to Silicon Valley than the Bay Area.

Still a relatively new owner, having bought the Jaguars in 2011, Khan is seen as an important envoy to expanding the NFL internationally.

These owners, for one reason or another, don’t have the same level of influence as others. A few once wielded power before age or health problems took their tolls; others are seen as up-and-comers who could be leaned on more heavily.

Alex Spanos

San Diego

Dean Spanos

San Diego

Paul Allen

Seattle

Jim Irsay

Indianapolis

Has in recent years taken a greater role in league matters, but personal problems have largely kept Irsay on the fringe.

A predictable vote Goodell can always count on; however, the Chargers’ owners are not seen as movers and shakers.

The Microsoft co-founder is seen as a wealthy, creative figure, but Allen rarely attends owners meetings or league functions.

Tom Benson

New Orleans

Pat Bowlen

Denver

Bidwill family

Arizona

Once among the NFL’s most powerful owners, the 88-year-old Saints’ owner’s health is waning and he no longer wields the influence he once did.

Owner Bill Bidwill has mostly stayed out of league matters, but son Michael — the team’s president — is hands-on and progressive.

Before health problems caused by Alzheimer’s disease, Bowlen was among the league’s most powerful men – and among the strongest Goodell loyalists.

Terry Pegula

Buffalo

Still less than a year since he assumed control of the Bills, Pegula’s power and desire to be involved in league politics aren’t yet known.

Disengaged or defiant, these owners are seen as prominent individuals the league office must manage — and keep happy — but for a variety of reasons are not involved in shaping NFL policy.

Woody Johnson

New York Jets

Mike Brown

Cincinnati

Stephen Ross

Miami

His $6.5 billion net worth and ability to assist the league on investments and acquisitions make him a strong potential ally.

Brown is an occasional critic of the league and is known to stand up for himself — occasionally to the league’s frustration.

He owns a team in New York, the country’s largest media market, but other than that Johnson is not seen as a relevant voice.

McCaskey family,

Chicago

Zygi Wilf

Minnesota

Ford family

Detroit

The league seems interested in the market, moving the NFL draft to Chicago, but the McCaskeys are mostly uninvolved.

Running the Lions is a side business; the family devotes the majority of its time to running Ford Motor Company.

He works with the league on some matters, but he is not closely involved in the inner workings of the NFL.

Glazer family

Tampa Bay

Jimmy Haslam

Cleveland

Dan Snyder

Washington

Has shown little to no interest in league politics.

Seen as a bully and antagonist, Snyder is not considered a meaningful figure in NFL politics.

A criminal investigation involving Haslam’s Pilot Flying J truck stop business has kept the Browns owner at a distance.

Carol and

Mark Davis

Oakland

Kenneth

Adams IV

Tennessee

Kenneth Adams IV, the late team founder’s grandson, is the only member of the franchise’s five-person ownership group to even have a hand in team matters.

Perhaps the least relevant NFL owners; this could change if the franchise moves to Los Angeles.

Note: The Green Bay Packers are the NFL’s only publicly owned company, and Mark Murphy, the team’s president, and chief executive, often represents the franchise at league gatherings.

SOURCE: Staff reports.