Fairfax County voters will be asked to vote Yes or No on three local bond questions. A simple majority is required for approval of each questions. Road Projects

Question: Shall the Board of Supervisors of Fairfax County, Virginia, contract a debt, borrow money and issue bonds of Fairfax County, Virginia, in addition to the secondary road bonds heretofore authorized, in the aggregate principal amount of $25,000,000 for the purpose of providing funds, with any other available funds, to finance the cost of constructing, reconstructing and improving the primary and secondary systems of State highways in the County, including the acquisition of necessary land?

Explanation: The proposal would provide $25 million for road improvements.

Proponents: The county says it needs the $25 million to finish a major road improvement program began with $30 million in bonds approved by voters last year. County officials say state funding for road projects has not kept pace with needs, forcing the local government to fill the gap.

Opponents: The only apparent organized opposition has been from the Fairfax County Taxpayers Alliance, which opposes increasing the bond indebtedness.The alliance says approval of the question will mean higher property taxes and argues that road maintenance and construction is the responsibility of the state. Parks

Question: Shall the Board of Supervisors of Fairfax County, Virginia, contract a debt, borrow money and issue bonds of Fairfax County, Virginia, in addition to the parks and park facilities bonds heretofore authorized, in the aggregate principal amount of $58,000,000 for the purpose of providing funds, with any other available funds, to finance the cost of a project to provide additional parks and park facilities, of which amount said County may pay not to exceed $50,000,000 for the acquisition, construction, development and equipment of additional parks and park facilities and the development and improvement of existing parks and park facilities by the Fairfax County Park Authority, and of which amount said County may pay not to exceed $8,000,000 as its share of the cost of parks and park facilities to be acquired, constructed, developed, improved and equipped by the Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority?

Explanation: The $58 million in bond funds would go to two parks programs: $50 million would be allocated for 176 improvement projects at Fairfax County parks, to be completed over seven years; $8 million would be the county's contribution to the Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority for a proposed five-year improvement plan acheduled to start in 1983.

Proponents: County officials say the bonds approved in 1977 for park improvements have been depleted and the county needs another bond issue to continue its park program.

Opponents: The Taxpayers Alliance is offering the only apparent organized opposition, saying the county already has enough parkland and that improvement programs proposed under the bond issue have been allotted politically rather than by need. Metrorail

Question: Shall the Board of Supervisors of Fairfax County, Virginia, contract a debt, borrow money and issue bonds of Fairfax County, Virginia, in the aggregate principal amount of $25,000,000 for the purpose of providing funds, with any other available funds, to pay the capital costs allocable to Fairfax County in the construction and acquisition of transit facilities in the Washington metropolitan area by the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority pursuant to the provisions of the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority Compact?

Explanation: The $25 million proposal would cover Fairfax County's continuing share of the costs of constructing Metrorail.

Proponents: The county's original bond to cover its share of building Metrorail will be exhausted this year, county officials say. The money will be used to help finance construction of six stations and 11.5 miles of track for the subway system in Fairfax County.

Opponents: The Taxpayers Alliance has shown the only apparent organized opposition to the bond, citing past cost overruns of the Metro system. The Alliance says Metro officials have lost much credibility in Fairfax County, where taxpayers have been asked to contribute more and more money but have seen little progress on the Metro lines in the county.