Where: Washington and Rosslyn.

Why: A history lesson.

How Far: About 10 miles.

It was 33 years ago this very weekend: Five smartly dressed guys wearing rubber gloves were busted at the Watergate complex for breaking into the Democratic National Committee headquarters in a botched spying job. They were arrested during the wee hours of Saturday, June 17, and the resulting scandal took down a president while giving the world a handy suffix for every future political flap (think Irangate, Monicagate).

Well, the '70s are back. Again. The recent identification of the famous source who helped The Washington Post's Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein unravel the story brought back a whiff of that bygone era. And what better way to relive the subterfuge of the "me decade" than with a Watergate nostalgia tour?

Our Wayback Machine cruise starts at another apartment -- Bernstein's old stomping grounds in Adams Morgan. After the investigation, he lived at the Ontario with then-wife Nora Ephron, now a director and screenwriter famous for movies such as this summer's "Bewitched." And during Watergate, he called the Biltmore home.

Woodward's apartment was downtown, and he used to signal from his balcony for meetings with secret source Deep Throat. Apartment 519 was used in the movie "All the President's Men," but Woodward actually lived in 617. (No red flags hung from any balconies last we looked, but if you see one, head to the parking garages of Rosslyn and look for mysterious guys lurking in the shadows.)

Next on the tour: the Eisenhower Executive Office Building, where some of the president's "plumbers" once had offices. The former offices for the Committee to Re-Elect the President were across the street in a plain-looking building at 1701 Pennsylvania Ave. Head west on G Street, and you'll find a cinematic view of the infamous Watergate.

"All the President's Men" has been in scarce supply at rental stores, but the nearby Tower Records has stocked up on the film that starred Robert Redford and Dustin Hoffman. And a clerk at One Stop News says the July Vanity Fair, which outed Woodward's source as W. Mark Felt, has been selling briskly.

In Georgetown, lunch at the old-school hangout the Guards will bring back a taste of what it was like to eat in the days before cholesterol concerns or the low-carb diet. Trek across the Key Bridge and see if you can figure out which garage Woodward met his source in -- it's a secret he's still holding onto. Give up? Well, maybe it was the parking lot at the Marriott, where a White House aide did hand off $350,000 in a secret Nixon campaign "reserve fund."

To maximize the authenticity of your tour, rent a Karmann Ghia, Woodward's ride at the time. And wherever you stop, park eight blocks away -- it throws off the surveillance. Just make sure you aren't followed, or the goons might leave you twisting slowly in the wind.

Mike Musgrove

Road Trip maps are available online at www.washingtonpost.com/roadtrip, as are addresses and hours of operation (be sure to check before you go). Have an idea for a trip? E-mail roadtrip@washpost.com.