Commodity market investors ought to pick up part of the bill for government regulation of their business, the Commodity Futures Trading Commission decided yesterday.

Meeting for the first time with Reagan administration appointees in the majority, the CFTC voted to ask Congress to impose user fees on all commodity trading transactions.

The commission did not suggest how much the fee ought to be, but a staff study on which the decision was based called for collecting $15 million a year--about 75 percent of the agency's $19.9 million budget.

The $15 million could be raised by a fee of 6 cents on every commodity futures contract bought or sold by industry insiders and a fee of 11 cents on every trade by public investors and other outsiders, the staff calculated.

The lower fees would be charged to members of commodity exchanges and the newly organized National Futures Association, which hopes to oversee commodity markets the way the National Association of Securities Dealers polices stock brokers.

Both NFA and the exchanges have extensive and expensive regulatory programs of their own, and their members already are paying part of the cost of regulation, CFTC officials noted.

Commodity industry lobbyists plan to fight user fees. "We're generally opposed to it," said Layton Laing of the Futures Industry Association. "With the NFA coming on stream and taking over more and more of the CFTC's responsibilities, we don't feel we should have to finance any more" regulation.

Membership in the new self-regulatory organization will be mandatory for much of the industry. NFA plans to finance operations with membership fees expected to total $3 million to $6 million a year. CFTC Votes -To Ask Fees -Of Investors By Jerry Knight Washington Post Staff Writer

Commodity market investors ought to pick up part of the bill for government regulation of their business, the Commodity Futures Trading Commission decided yesterday.

Meeting for the first time with Reagan administration appointees in the majority, the CFTC voted to ask Congress to impose user fees on all commodity trading transactions.

The commission did not suggest how much the fee ought to be, but a staff study on which the decision was based called for collecting $15 million a year--about 75 percent of the agency's $19.9 million budget.

The $15 million could be raised by a fee of 6 cents on every commodity futures contract bought or sold by industry insiders and a fee of 11 cents on every trade by public investors and other outsiders, the staff calculated.

The lower fees would be charged to members of commodity exchanges and the newly organized National Futures Association, which hopes to oversee commodity markets the way the National Association of Securities Dealers polices stock brokers.

Both NFA and the exchanges have extensive and expensive regulatory programs of their own, and their members already are paying part of the cost of regulation, CFTC officials noted.

Commodity industry lobbyists plan to fight user fees. "We're generally opposed to it," said Layton Laing of the Futures Industry Association. "With the NFA coming on stream and taking over more and more of the CFTC's responsibilities, we don't feel we should have to finance any more" regulation.

Membership in the new self-regulatory organization will be mandatory for much of the industry. NFA plans to finance operations with membership fees expected to total $3 million to $6 million a year.