An improving but still tight market for jet aircraft helped boost Boeing Co.'s second-quarter profits by 29.6 percent to $92 million (95 cents a share) from $71 million (74 cents) a year ago, the world's largest manufacturer of commercial aircraft said yesterday.

Revenue for the quarter rose to $3.15 billion from $2.4 billion a year earlier, Boeing said.

For the first six months of the year, the company reported net earnings of $182 million ($1.88) compared with $132 million ($1.37) in 1982. First-half revenue totaled $6.13 billion compared with $4.48 billion for the same period a year ago, Boeing said.

Board Chairman T. A. Wilson attributed the increased earnings to higher commercial jet transport sales, improved earnings on U.S. government programs and a lower level of research, developmental and engineering expense on new jet transport programs.

However, he said, the increase was partially offset by the impact of the extremely competitive market for jet transport programs.

Blaming the sluggish economy and higher costs for materials, Eastman Kodak Co. officials yesterday announced a sharp drop in second-quarter and first-half profits from year-earlier levels.

Kodak President Kay Whitmore and Colby Chandler, chairman and chief executive officer of the company, said in a joint statement that 1983 would be a year of bottoming out, after which recovery then can begin.

For the quarter, worldwide sales for the giant manufacturer of cameras, film and other photographic equipment stood at $2.4 billion, 1 percent below the $2.43 billion reported in the second quarter in 1982.

Net earnings for the quarter were $169.4 million ($1.02 a share), a decline from the prior year's $248.3 million ($1.52).

Sales from the first half of 1983 were down 3 percent to $4.53 billion from $4.68 billion in the first half of 1982.

Net earnings for the half-year were $218.8 million ($1.32), a decrease of 49 percent from last year's total of $429.6 million ($2.64).

Whitmore and Chandler said Kodak would continue to operate "in this sluggish economy," and that earnings will be "under pressure for the balance of the year."

"Many of the negative factors which faced Kodak earlier this year are still affecting the company, most notably lower unit volume, adverse impact of foreign currency fluctuations against the United States' dollar, higher depreciation and higher materials costs, especially silver," they said. Boeing Co. Profits Up 29.6%; Kodak Reports Sharp Decline From News Services

An improving but still tight market for jet aircraft helped boost Boeing Co.'s second-quarter profits by 29.6 percent to $92 million (95 cents a share) from $71 million (74 cents) a year ago, the world's largest manufacturer of commercial aircraft said yesterday.

Revenue for the quarter rose to $3.15 billion from $2.4 billion a year earlier, Boeing said.

For the first six months of the year, the company reported net earnings of $182 million ($1.88) compared with $132 million ($1.37) in 1982. First-half revenue totaled $6.13 billion compared with $4.48 billion for the same period a year ago, Boeing said.

Board Chairman T. A. Wilson attributed the increased earnings to higher commercial jet transport sales, improved earnings on U.S. government programs and a lower level of research, developmental and engineering expense on new jet transport programs.

However, he said, the increase was partially offset by the impact of the extremely competitive market for jet transport programs.

Blaming the sluggish economy and higher costs for materials, Eastman Kodak Co. officials yesterday announced a sharp drop in second-quarter and first-half profits from year-earlier levels.

Kodak President Kay Whitmore and Colby Chandler, chairman and chief executive officer of the company, said in a joint statement that 1983 would be a year of bottoming out, after which recovery then can begin.

For the quarter, worldwide sales for the giant manufacturer of cameras, film and other photographic equipment stood at $2.4 billion, 1 percent below the $2.43 billion reported in the second quarter in 1982.

Net earnings for the quarter were $169.4 million ($1.02 a share), a decline from the prior year's $248.3 million ($1.52).

Sales from the first half of 1983 were down 3 percent to $4.53 billion from $4.68 billion in the first half of 1982.

Net earnings for the half-year were $218.8 million ($1.32), a decrease of 49 percent from last year's total of $429.6 million ($2.64).

Whitmore and Chandler said Kodak would continue to operate "in this sluggish economy," and that earnings will be "under pressure for the balance of the year."

"Many of the negative factors which faced Kodak earlier this year are still affecting the company, most notably lower unit volume, adverse impact of foreign currency fluctuations against the United States' dollar, higher depreciation and higher materials costs, especially silver," they said.