The administration has enough votes to pass $8.4 billion in additional funding for the International Monetary Fund, Treasury Secretary Donald T. Regan said yesterday, contradicting House Speaker Thomas P. (Tip) O'Neill Jr.

O'Neill said the measure wouldn't pass "unless a lot of changes are made out there." Last week, House Banking Committee Chairman Fernand St Germain (D-R.I.) offered a substitute IMF funding bill incorporating changes he said would appease the measure's opponents who view it as a bailout for big banks.

The administration has maintained that the additional funding is needed to help financially strapped Third World countries survive their debt crises.

Regan said in an interview yesterday that, although the authorization and appropriation for the additional funding have not passed, "I think it's just a matter of time now" before the funding is approved. "It's not a matter of if."

Regan cited two test votes Friday defeating two amendments that effectively would have gutted the assistance as indicating that the House would approve the legislation. The Senate already has approved an IMF bill.

O'Neill also criticized the administration for focusing too much attention on fighting legislation to cut off funds for covert U.S. aid to Nicaraguan rebels and not enough on the IMF bill. Regan, shrugging his shoulders, said "I don't know what further could be expected" of the administration in lobbying for the agency funding. Regan Views IMF Aid Bill As Passable By Jane Seaberry Washington Post Staff Writer

The administration has enough votes to pass $8.4 billion in additional funding for the International Monetary Fund, Treasury Secretary Donald T. Regan said yesterday, contradicting House Speaker Thomas P. (Tip) O'Neill Jr.

O'Neill said the measure wouldn't pass "unless a lot of changes are made out there." Last week, House Banking Committee Chairman Fernand St Germain (D-R.I.) offered a substitute IMF funding bill incorporating changes he said would appease the measure's opponents who view it as a bailout for big banks.

The administration has maintained that the additional funding is needed to help financially strapped Third World countries survive their debt crises.

Regan said in an interview yesterday that, although the authorization and appropriation for the additional funding have not passed, "I think it's just a matter of time now" before the funding is approved. "It's not a matter of if."

Regan cited two test votes Friday defeating two amendments that effectively would have gutted the assistance as indicating that the House would approve the legislation. The Senate already has approved an IMF bill.

O'Neill also criticized the administration for focusing too much attention on fighting legislation to cut off funds for covert U.S. aid to Nicaraguan rebels and not enough on the IMF bill. Regan, shrugging his shoulders, said "I don't know what further could be expected" of the administration in lobbying for the agency funding.