TOKYO, NOV. 27 -- Maki Kanabayashi, a 23-year-old actress, wouldn't dream of gloating about the fact that a Japanese company is purchasing the American movie studio responsible for producing "Jaws" and "E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial." On the contrary, the news makes her uneasy.

As she stood in line to watch a film in Tokyo's Ginza district, Kanabayashi said it worried her to learn that Matsushita Electric Industrial Co. has agreed to acquire MCA Inc., the parent company of Universal Studios.

The takeover "might cause friction" between the United States and Japan, she fretted, particularly since it comes on top of other big acquisitions such as Sony Corp.'s purchase of Columbia Pictures.

Similar views were voiced by other Japanese today in the wake of the announcement Monday that Matsushita, the Osaka-based consumer electronics giant, is paying $7.5 billion to buy one of the biggest names in the U.S. entertainment industry.

The news that yet another major Hollywood prize was falling under Japanese control evoked little if any smug or triumphant comment. Rather, the prevailing view seemed to lie somewhere between indifference and alarm, with some people even expressing empathy for any resentment Americans might be feeling about the situation.

Observing that foreign firms have found it almost impossible to take over major Japanese companies or properties, Masahiko Yoshikawa, 32, a trading company employee, said the Matsushita-MCA deal "would be okay, if Americans were allowed to buy the Tokyo Municipal Building."

Fears over the prospect of an American backlash were evident in media coverage of the takeover. "American Anti-Japan Criticism Could Be Rekindled," declared a headline in the Yomiuri Shimbun, Japan's largest newspaper.

Television news reports showed New York pedestrians being interviewed about the deal, and the Asahi Shimbun, another major daily, reported that Matsushita had eagerly sought to complete the negotiations before the Dec. 7 anniversary of Pearl Harbor so as to avoid unpleasant associations.

Some news stories, by contrast, reported with relief that the deal would probably stir up less political trouble in Washington than might have been expected.

The Mainichi Shimbun newspaper reported from the U.S. capital that "reaction against Japan appears minor." The paper asserted that Americans are, if anything, worried about losing the flow of capital from Tokyo.

The Japanese are considerably more confident than they used to be a decade or so ago, thanks to the country's economic success. So they worry less about every twist and turn in U.S. attitude toward their country, and they appear much more willing to lecture Americans about the deficiencies in U.S. social and economic practices.

But the Japanese generally recoil from appearing cocky, and on past occasions when big U.S. firms have been sold to Japanese companies, people here have "wanted to keep their heads down," said Gregory Clark, a professor of Japanese studies and economics at Tokyo's Sophia University.

Clark, who often addresses business groups here and warns them about the likelihood of a foreign backlash, said that "the top businessmen will come back fairly hard-nosed, and say, 'Well, if these guys want to sell out, why blame us for buying in?' " But the average Japanese, he said, realizes that takeovers of foreign firms by Japanese companies "is going to lead to trouble."

Standing in the Ginza movie line, Kanabayashi's boyfriend, Kazuaki Noritsuke, 23, said that both Matsushita and MCA should benefit financially from the takeover. But he said he didn't feel any sense of pride about the business deal, and he shared some of his girlfriend's concern about the impact on American-Japanese relations.

If a Japanese company has as much as the $6 billion-plus that Matsushita is spending on MCA, he said, at least one-tenth of the money should go to aiding the U.S.-led military effort in the Persian Gulf.

Special correspondent Yasuharu Ishizawa contributed to this article.

COMPANY....................PURCHASER...PRICE IN..........DATE

.......................................MILLIONS

MCA......................Matsushita*.....$7,500.....Nov. 1990

Columbia Pictures...............Sony......4,950....Sept. 1989

Firestone

Tire & Rubber...........Bridgestone......2,650.....Feb. 1988

Inter Continental

Hotels.................Seibu/Saison......2,150....Sept. 1988

CBS Records.....................Sony......2,000.....Nov. 1987

Westin Hotels...................Aoki......1,350.....Oct. 1987

CIT Group............Dai-Ichi Kangyo......1,280....Sept. 1989

Gould..................Nippon Mining......1,100.....Aug. 1988

Aristech Chemical.........Mitsubishi........877.....Jan. 1990

Rockefeller Group.........Mitsubishi........846.....Oct. 1989

*Uncompleted deal.

NOTE: Purchase price may not reflect debt assumed in all cases.